Bacon pleads innocent in Greensboro killing

Featured

Ryan Bacon (left) and his lawyer, Jon Valsangiacomo, in Orleans Superior Court shortly after Mr. Bacon pled innocent to a first-degree murder charge in the shooting death of his grandfather Lou-Ron Schneider.  Police say Mr. Bacon shot Mr. Schneider Sunday after a quarrel over his grandfather’s relationship with his mother.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Ryan Bacon (left) and his lawyer, Jon Valsangiacomo, in Orleans Superior Court shortly after Mr. Bacon pled innocent to a first-degree murder charge in the shooting death of his grandfather Lou-Ron Schneider. Police say Mr. Bacon shot Mr. Schneider Sunday after a quarrel over his grandfather’s relationship with his mother. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle August 26, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

NEWPORT — The man who allegedly shot and killed Lou-Ron Schneider of Greensboro Sunday pled innocent to a first degree murder charge Tuesday and was ordered held without bail.

Police say Mr. Schneider was the shooter’s grandfather, and the two had a dispute about Mr. Schneider’s relationship with his mother.

According to a police press release, after a roughly 24-hour manhunt, Ryan P. Bacon, 30, of Point Pleasant, New Jersey, turned himself in at the Hardwick police station Monday evening and was taken to the Northeast Regional Correctional Facility.

He made a brief appearance in the Criminal Division of Orleans County Superior Court the next morning where his lawyer, Jon Valsangiacomo, entered the innocent plea and reserved the right to argue that Mr. Bacon should be released on bail while awaiting trial.

Judge Timothy Tomasi said the presumption in cases carrying the possibility of a life…  To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share

Feds sentence Niles to 16 months

Featured

Derick Niles, left, consults with his lawyer, Christopher Davis, at a court hearing in Newport in April 2104.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Derick Niles, left, consults with his lawyer, Christopher Davis, at a court hearing in Newport in April 2104. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle August 19, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

Derick J. Niles, who climbed onto his garage roof in September of 2013 while attempting to hold off an imaginary police posse, will serve 16 months in a federal correctional facility because he is an admitted drug user who carried a .360 caliber rifle up with him.

Mr. Niles, 37, of Newport, was sentenced in U.S. District Court by Judge Christina Reiss after he pled guilty earlier this year to “being an unlawful user of a controlled substance” in possession of a firearm.

Once Mr. Niles leaves prison, his sentence calls for him to serve three years of supervised release. He must submit to a drug test within 15 days of getting out of prison and at least two more tests as required by the court, according to…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share

Kidder Hill wind project draw fierce opposition

Featured

Pictured here, David Blittersdorf, the professional wind developer who plans to put up the turbines and owns the land they would be sited on, came to the meeting but was not allowed to speak. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Pictured here, David Blittersdorf, the professional wind developer who plans to put up the turbines and owns the land they would be sited on, came to the meeting but was not allowed to speak. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle August 12, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

IRASBURG — About 40 people, including two state legislators, came to the Irasburg Select Board meeting on Monday night to protest two commercial scale wind towers proposed for nearby Kidder Hill.

David Blittersdorf, the professional wind developer who plans to put up the turbines and owns the land they would be sited on, also came to the meeting but was not allowed to speak.  After listening to well over an hour of public comments, the select board agreed to have some answers at its next meeting to questions about exactly what the town can and cannot do regarding wind development.

Kidder Hill is about four miles northwest of Irasburg. The two towers would produce…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share

Stenger lays out ambitious plans for airport

Featured

Bill Stenger, standing, lays out his plans for the future of the airport in Coventry.  Listening, from left to right, are Guy Rouelle of VTrans, Scott Wheeler, and Ary Quiros, who heads Flight Design Americas, a company that plans to manufacture light airplanes at the airport.  The meeting was held in an aircraft hangar because Parker Pie Wings has permanently closed its doors.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Bill Stenger, standing, lays out his plans for the future of the airport in Coventry. Listening, from left to right, are Guy Rouelle of VTrans, Scott Wheeler, and Ary Quiros, who heads Flight Design Americas, a company that plans to manufacture light airplanes at the airport. The meeting was held in an aircraft hangar because Parker Pie Wings has permanently closed its doors. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle August 5, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

COVENTRY — A crowd of about 30 pilots legislators, reporters, and the curious found their way to a hangar at what will soon be the Northeast Kingdom International Airport on Thursday afternoon, July 30. The attraction was Bill Stenger, who arrived with a drawing of a new 10,000-square-foot terminal building that he said will be built starting in the spring of 2016.

In addition to the terminal, Mr. Stenger outlined plans that include a bonded warehouse and a building for the manufacture of Flight Design light aircraft.

A bonded warehouse allows goods that Customs duties are ordinarily paid on to be stored without the need to pay duties. Orleans, Lamoille, and Caledonia counties are…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share

Norrie pleads guilty to O’Hagan murder

Featured

Michael Norrie is brought into court.  He pled guilty to murdering Mary Pat O’Hagan.  Photo by Todd Wellington courtesy of the Caledonian-Record

Michael Norrie is brought into court. He pled guilty to murdering Mary Pat O’Hagan. Photo by Todd Wellington courtesy of the Caledonian-Record

copyright the Chronicle July 22, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

ST. JOHNSBURY — The man who pulled the trigger admitted his role in the murder of Mary Pat O’Hagan Tuesday. Michael Norrie, 24, of Sheffield stood in the courtroom of the Criminal Division of Caledonia County Superior Court and pled guilty to burglary, kidnapping, and first degree murder in Mrs. O’Hagan’s death in 2010.

His plea was part of an agreement with prosecutors that, if accepted by Judge Robert Bent, will see Mr. Norrie spend 23 years of a 23-year-to-50-year sentence in prison. When released he will be on indefinite probation unless released by the court, the agreement states.

First degree murder carries a penalty of up to…

To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

 

Share

New state park opens overlooking Willoughby Lake

Featured

Windsor and Florence Wright stand in front of the stone outline of the original farmhouse on Hinton Hill Road where their family once spent its summers.   The Wrights, who now live outside of Kansas City, Kansas, donated the 356-acre parcel of land in Westmore  to create Sentinel Rock State Park.  Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Windsor and Florence Wright stand in front of the stone outline of the original farmhouse on Hinton Hill Road where their family once spent its summers. The Wrights, who now live outside of Kansas City, Kansas, donated the 356-acre parcel of land in Westmore to create Sentinel Rock State Park. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle July 15, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

WESTMORE — About 13,000 years ago, the last retreating glacier left a huge boulder, twice as tall as a person, overlooking Lake Willoughby near the top of the Hinton Hill Road in Westmore. Generations have watched sunsets from the rock, picnicked at its base, and gathered berries in the surrounding fields.

On July 11 the great rock, and the site of the old farmhouse that once stood nearby, became the focal points of Vermont’s new Sentinel Rock State Park.

Vermont’s newest state park was made possible by the generous gift of 356 acres by Windsor and Florence Wright. The Wrights summered in an old Victorian farmhouse on the site for decades after Mr. Wright’s father bought the place in 1947, said Vermont State Parks Director Craig Whipple….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share

Ward attends his last city council meeting

Featured

City Manager John Ward (right) offers a suggestion to Newport’s aldermen at his last city council meeting.  To his left sat Alderman Steven Vincent.  Photos by Joseph Gresser

City Manager John Ward (right) offers a suggestion to Newport’s aldermen at his last city council meeting. To his left sat Alderman Steven Vincent. Photos by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle July 8, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

NEWPORT — As Mayor Paul Monette listed those in attendance at Monday’s city council meeting he noted a milestone.

“For the last time John Ward is sitting as city manager,” Mr. Monette said.

Mr. Ward, who has served as city manager for 15 years, and was an alderman before that, will retire on July 15.

The council chose his replacement, Laura Dolgin, at a special meeting held Wednesday, July 1. She sat at the back of the council’s chambers Monday taking notes.

Mr. Ward’s impending departure was… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share

Dolgin will be new city manager

Featured

Laura Dolgin, who was recently hired as Newport’s next city manager, poses with her husband, Rick Geisel, on Main Street.  Behind the couple are two buildings that have been, and will be, important in her working life.  At left is the Orleans County Courthouse where she served as county clerk, and on the right is Newport’s Municipal Building, where she will start work on July 20.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Laura Dolgin, who was recently hired as Newport’s next city manager, poses with her husband, Rick Geisel, on Main Street. Behind the couple are two buildings that have been, and will be, important in her working life. At left is the Orleans County Courthouse where she served as county clerk, and on the right is Newport’s Municipal Building, where she will start work on July 20. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle July 8, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

 

NEWPORT — Laura Dolgin and Rick Geisel, her husband, put their Derby house on the market in April. Their plan was to move to central Vermont to be closer to Ms. Dolgin’s Montpelier job.

She had even set a deadline.

“I wanted to move before Daylight Savings Time ended,” she said. “I couldn’t face making the drive in the dark.”

Their plans changed on July 1 when the Newport City Council voted unanimously to hire her as the next city manager.

The house, though, remains on the market, Ms. Dolgin said two days later at an interview conducted down the street from both a former and her next workplace. If all goes well… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share

Plans for local dispatch center slow down

Featured

 

Assistant Judge Ben Batchelder speaks to a meeting of selectmen and first responders Monday evening at the Orleans County Courthouse.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Assistant Judge Ben Batchelder speaks to a meeting of selectmen and first responders Monday evening at the Orleans County Courthouse. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle July 1, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

NEWPORT — Select boards and side judges encouraged the Orleans County Sheriff’s Department to keep planning for a local dispatch center, but suggested that a timetable calling for opening by the end of the year was too ambitious.

At a meeting held at the county courthouse Monday evening, Assistant Judge Ben Batchelder explained the county’s budget process and said that, even moving as quickly as possible, money to establish and run the proposed dispatch center would not be available until October 2016.

The county holds a public hearing every December to discuss budget needs, which include…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share

In Barton: A mixed reaction to townwide yard sale

Featured

 

Antiques and More was one of the many antique shops in Barton that did well at Barton’s townwide yard sale this year.  To other businesses, it was just another Saturday.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Antiques and More was one of the many antique shops in Barton that did well at Barton’s townwide yard sale this year. To other businesses, it was just another Saturday. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle July 1, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

BARTON — The townwide yard sale, started 20 years old with the hope of bringing people to Barton, certainly does that. Whether it also brings economic activity to local businesses likely depends on what they sell.

Saturday’s annual yard sale was a real boon for the antique shops in town, but other businesses didn’t report much, if any, economic benefit at all.

In a single sale, Village Treasures owner Leo McElroy made half of what he expected to make for the whole day.

But at the Circle K, James Marcy said the mini-mart actually lost money because it staffed extra for customers who didn’t arrive.

And at The Parson’s Corner restaurant, owner Dave Rath said…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share