Ward attends his last city council meeting

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City Manager John Ward (right) offers a suggestion to Newport’s aldermen at his last city council meeting.  To his left sat Alderman Steven Vincent.  Photos by Joseph Gresser

City Manager John Ward (right) offers a suggestion to Newport’s aldermen at his last city council meeting. To his left sat Alderman Steven Vincent. Photos by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle July 8, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

NEWPORT — As Mayor Paul Monette listed those in attendance at Monday’s city council meeting he noted a milestone.

“For the last time John Ward is sitting as city manager,” Mr. Monette said.

Mr. Ward, who has served as city manager for 15 years, and was an alderman before that, will retire on July 15.

The council chose his replacement, Laura Dolgin, at a special meeting held Wednesday, July 1. She sat at the back of the council’s chambers Monday taking notes.

Mr. Ward’s impending departure was… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Dolgin will be new city manager

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Laura Dolgin, who was recently hired as Newport’s next city manager, poses with her husband, Rick Geisel, on Main Street.  Behind the couple are two buildings that have been, and will be, important in her working life.  At left is the Orleans County Courthouse where she served as county clerk, and on the right is Newport’s Municipal Building, where she will start work on July 20.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Laura Dolgin, who was recently hired as Newport’s next city manager, poses with her husband, Rick Geisel, on Main Street. Behind the couple are two buildings that have been, and will be, important in her working life. At left is the Orleans County Courthouse where she served as county clerk, and on the right is Newport’s Municipal Building, where she will start work on July 20. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle July 8, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

 

NEWPORT — Laura Dolgin and Rick Geisel, her husband, put their Derby house on the market in April. Their plan was to move to central Vermont to be closer to Ms. Dolgin’s Montpelier job.

She had even set a deadline.

“I wanted to move before Daylight Savings Time ended,” she said. “I couldn’t face making the drive in the dark.”

Their plans changed on July 1 when the Newport City Council voted unanimously to hire her as the next city manager.

The house, though, remains on the market, Ms. Dolgin said two days later at an interview conducted down the street from both a former and her next workplace. If all goes well… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Plans for local dispatch center slow down

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Assistant Judge Ben Batchelder speaks to a meeting of selectmen and first responders Monday evening at the Orleans County Courthouse.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Assistant Judge Ben Batchelder speaks to a meeting of selectmen and first responders Monday evening at the Orleans County Courthouse. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle July 1, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

NEWPORT — Select boards and side judges encouraged the Orleans County Sheriff’s Department to keep planning for a local dispatch center, but suggested that a timetable calling for opening by the end of the year was too ambitious.

At a meeting held at the county courthouse Monday evening, Assistant Judge Ben Batchelder explained the county’s budget process and said that, even moving as quickly as possible, money to establish and run the proposed dispatch center would not be available until October 2016.

The county holds a public hearing every December to discuss budget needs, which include…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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In Barton: A mixed reaction to townwide yard sale

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Antiques and More was one of the many antique shops in Barton that did well at Barton’s townwide yard sale this year.  To other businesses, it was just another Saturday.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Antiques and More was one of the many antique shops in Barton that did well at Barton’s townwide yard sale this year. To other businesses, it was just another Saturday. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle July 1, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

BARTON — The townwide yard sale, started 20 years old with the hope of bringing people to Barton, certainly does that. Whether it also brings economic activity to local businesses likely depends on what they sell.

Saturday’s annual yard sale was a real boon for the antique shops in town, but other businesses didn’t report much, if any, economic benefit at all.

In a single sale, Village Treasures owner Leo McElroy made half of what he expected to make for the whole day.

But at the Circle K, James Marcy said the mini-mart actually lost money because it staffed extra for customers who didn’t arrive.

And at The Parson’s Corner restaurant, owner Dave Rath said…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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New eatery comes to Barton

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WEB eddie truck outsidecopyright the Chronicle June 24, 2015

by Natalie Hormilla

BARTON — Eddie Seadale’s newest food venture is operated out of a truck. Mr. Seadale, former owner of The Parson’s Corner restaurant, has set up the truck at the business he owns with his wife, Lori, River’s Edge Farmstand.

Mr. Seadale cooks and serves up a menu that’s made up on the fly — but he doesn’t seem even remotely worried about that.

“When Mom will say, Edward, I’m thinking of making this, I say, Great, because I know it’ll be good,” he said, zipping about his teeny kitchen Monday afternoon. “That’s how we roll.”

Mr. Seadale and his mother, Anne Seadale, are the duo behind the Copper Plate, which opened earlier this month. Mr. Seadale’s mother turns 83 in July, and the two have worked together before.

“We worked together in Southie at my first place.….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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At Gardner park: Block party kicks off summer meal program

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Ellen Apple helps her Spiderman suit-clad son Myles hold a bunny at the petting zoo at the block party in Gardener Park in Newport on June 18.  For each animal he held, he asked his mom to go find “Nana” so he could show her.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Ellen Apple helps her Spiderman suit-clad son Myles hold a bunny at the petting zoo at the block party in Gardener Park in Newport on June 18. For each animal he held, he asked his mom to go find “Nana” so he could show her. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle June 24, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

NEWPORT — Green Mountain Farm-to-School’s (GMFTS) second annual block party, held at Gardner Park, was bigger and better than last year’s huge success.

That was GMFTS Chairman Julie Poulin’s assessment of the even, which was held on Thursday.

“We’re very lucky to have lots of health and education related organizations in our area,” she said.

Each of those organizations had a tent at the block party, many of which were provided by Newport Parks and Recreation, Ms. Poulin said.

The purpose of the event was to raise awareness about local organizations with activities or products that promote health, and to celebrate the beginning of GMFTS’ ten-week summer meal program called the Lunchbox.

The Lunchbox’s food truck was serving free meals for kids….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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USDA money available for home repair and ownership

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Leonard Gregoire stands in front of the house in Lyndonville, which he purchased with a USDA loan through its direct home ownership program.  Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Leonard Gregoire stands in front of the house in Lyndonville, which he purchased with a USDA loan through its direct home ownership program. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle June 24, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has about any kind of loan or grant a low-income homeowner, or prospective homeowner, could possibly need. And it wants to give that money out, especially in the Northeast Kingdom.

That’s the message rural development specialist Dianne Drown and regional director for rural development Jon-Michael Muise, both with the USDA, gave at a public meeting held at the Burke school on June 17.

The point of the USDA rural housing program is to help people own houses that are safe, clean, and affordable to heat.

Depending on income and credit, people could be eligible for a loan of up to $205,000 in Orleans County, $200,000 in Essex County, or $215,000 in….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Historic Brick Kingdom bridges refurbished

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Dennis Walker blocked off the bridge near the Brick Kingdom buildings too.  Vehicles don’t have space to cross anymore because of the wooden frame built for that very purpose.  Pedestrians can cross safely on either side of the frame.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Dennis Walker blocked off the bridge near the Brick Kingdom buildings too. Vehicles don’t have space to cross anymore because of the wooden frame built for that very purpose. Pedestrians can cross safely on either side of the frame. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle June 17, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

BARTON — Dennis Walker has temporarily repaired the two Brick Kingdom bridges here, making them safe for pedestrians.

The Barton Historical Society hired Mr. Walker to fix the bridges, which were rotting in some places.

“This is just a temporary fix so that pedestrians can still cross them and their vehicles won’t, because they need repair,” said Dottie Hathaway, director and secretary of the Barton Historic Society’s board.

The bridges are on Barton Historical Society land, which makes the organization responsible….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Brownington gets $50,000 grant for new truck

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The town of Brownington got a new truck with the help of a $50,000 matching grant from the USDA.  From left to right are Brownington road foreman Leonard Messier, Town Clerk Cheryl Galipeau, select board Chairman Beverly White, Misty Sinsigalli of the USDA, grant writer Jan Delaney, and selectman Terry Curtis.  Photo by Elizabeth Trail

The town of Brownington got a new truck with the help of a $50,000 matching grant from the USDA. From left to right are Brownington road foreman Leonard Messier, Town Clerk Cheryl Galipeau, select board Chairman Beverly White, Misty Sinsigalli of the USDA, grant writer Jan Delaney, and selectman Terry Curtis. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle June 17, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

BROWNINGTON — Jan Delaney describes herself as “just a Brownington citizen who wanted to help.”

She’s not a town official. She had never written a grant before, let alone a major one.  But when she saw that her town needed money to pay for a new truck, Ms. Delaney learned by doing.

In January, with help from Town Clerk Cheryl Galipeau and former Selectman Dean Perry, Ms. Delaney put in an application to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) for a $50,000 community facilities grant.

On June 11, Ms. Delaney’s efforts were rewarded when officials from the USDA came to Brownington….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Bread and Puppet Theater’s museum turns 40

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Here, Elka Schumann, whose husband, Peter Schumann, founded the Bread and Puppet Theater, sits next to the museum guard, a wooden figurine.  Traditionally, he sleeps in a nightcap in his bed on the bench next to where Ms. Schumann is sitting all winter when the museum is closed, and is woken up each summer for the open house.  When he’s on duty he wears a cap.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Here, Elka Schumann, whose husband, Peter Schumann, founded the Bread and Puppet Theater, sits next to the museum guard, a wooden figurine. Traditionally, he sleeps in a nightcap in his bed on the bench next to where Ms. Schumann is sitting all winter when the museum is closed, and is woken up each summer for the open house. When he’s on duty he wears a cap. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle June 10, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

GLOVER — Visitors jammed the lanes around the Bread and Puppet Theater’s grounds here with their cars on Sunday when they came for the museum’s open house.

The theater celebrated the fortieth anniversary of its puppet museum on Sunday with shape note singing, harp music, and mini-plays scattered around the yard.

The smell of garlic from the aioli that was served with Bread and Puppet’s signature sourdough bread permeated the museum.

Visitors could wander through over 40 years worth of big puppets and peruse and purchase posters, pamphlets, and books.

Burt Porter, a Glover poet and musician who has participated in opening the museum yearly since its inception, was given a wooden medal….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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contact Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph at natgagjo@bartonchronicle.com

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