In Glover: Santa comes to town, in a fire truck

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Alex Young of Glover attempts to toss a miniature wreath on one of the tines of a ten-point buck painted by Lorie Seadale.  Photos by David Dudley

Alex Young of Glover attempts to toss a miniature wreath on one of the tines of a ten-point buck painted by Lorie Seadale. Photos by David Dudley

copyright the Chronicle December 17, 2014

by David Dudley

GLOVER — The fire station here was packed with children and their parents Saturday night waiting for Santa to arrive. Though Mr. Claus was late — apparently due to problems with his sled — there were still lots of things to do at the tenth annual Ride a Fire Truck with Santa, held by the Glover Volunteer Fire Department.

But nobody had to remind the children not to pout or cry. They were in the mood to make merry.

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On Craftsbury Common: Candlelight vigil held for victims of police violence

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Julie Lou Lepping, a student at Sterling College, organized a candlelight vigil Sunday to protest recent police violence in Missouri and New York.  “I felt so angry and confused by the injustices being done to people of color in America,” Ms. Lepping said.  “I felt I had to do something.  How can you not?”   Photo by David Dudley

Julie Lou Lepping, a student at Sterling College, organized a candlelight vigil Sunday to protest recent police violence in Missouri and New York. “I felt so angry and confused by the injustices being done to people of color in America,” Ms. Lepping said. “I felt I had to do something. How can you not?” Photo by David Dudley

copyright the Chronicle December 10, 2014

by David Dudley

CRAFTSBURY — Roughly 40 people gathered on Craftsbury Common Sunday night to hold a candlelight vigil in response to police violence against black Americans.

Julia Lou Lepping, a student at Sterling College from Louisville, Kentucky, organized the vigil. As the 40 people, who all carried candles, filled the center of the snow-covered common, they formed a circle.

Though it was dark, and two degrees below zero, a full moon bathed the group in cool light.

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In Greensboro: After 114 years, Willey’s Store remains famously eclectic

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Robert Willey-Hurst, current president of Willey's Store, Inc., has worked tirelessly these past six years to see that the store remains a community center.  Photos by David Dudley

Robert Willey-Hurst, current president of Willey’s Store, Inc., has worked tirelessly these past six years to see that the store remains a community center. Photos by David Dudley

copyright the Chronicle December 3, 2014

by David Dudley

GREENSBORO — While stories about Black Friday’s frenzied shopping flooded the Internet, the day after Thanksgiving began like any other at Willey’s Store, which is now in its one hundred and fourteenth year of operation.

Robert Willey-Hurst, president of the Willey’s Store, Inc., opened the store at 7 a.m. as usual. The only thing he did differently was stretch the annual winter sale, which usually runs for a single weekend, into a two-week event this year.

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In Norton: Bo, the two-legged goat

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Bo, who lives in the house with the Greenleafs, was born without the use of his hind legs.

Bo, who lives in the house with the Greenleafs, was born without the use of his hind legs.  Photos by David Dudley

copyright the Chronicle November 26, 2014 

by David Dudley

NORTON — One afternoon in the summer of 2012, David Greenleaf and his wife, Bunny, went out to run errands. They had been raising and breeding goats for three years at this point and knew one of their nanny goats was due any day. Though they knew it would be soon, Mr. and Mrs. Greenleaf were surprised by what awaited them when they returned home that day.

“The mother had birthed four little ones,” Ms. Greenleaf said. “Three of them were dead. And then there was Bo —short for Bow-legged — a baby French Alpine goat, laying there in the wood shavings. We knew he was special from the moment we saw him.”

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Peggy Loux is a woman with a purpose

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Peggy Loux received the Agency on Aging Community Service Award on Monday.  Photo by David Dudley

Peggy Loux received the Agency on Aging Community Service Award on Monday. Photo by David Dudley

copyright the Chronicle November 19, 2014

by David Dudley

JAY — Margaret “Peggy” Loux, who is now serving her fifth year on the Jay Select Board, received the Agency on Aging Community Service Award Monday.

According to Ms. Loux, everybody has got to work, and everybody has got to have a purpose. What is Peggy Loux’s purpose?

Though her various activities would suggest otherwise, she claims to be a shy person.

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Rifle season: Mild winters may lead to higher success rate

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Makenzie Smith, 10, of Irasburg shot her first buck, an eight-pointer weighing 164 pounds, during Youth Weekend — in her secret spot!  Photo courtesy of her very proud Grampa Brent Shafer

Makenzie Smith, 10, of Irasburg shot her first buck, an eight-pointer weighing 164 pounds, during Youth Weekend — in her secret spot! Photo courtesy of her very proud Grampa Brent Shafer

copyright the Chronicle November 12, 2014

by Paul Lefebvre

Between sunrise on Saturday, opening day of rifle season on deer, and closing day at sunset on November 30, hunters will lose roughly 30 minutes of hunting time.

That’s because they can hunt deer from 30 minutes before sunrise and 30 minutes after sunset during the 16-day season.

But sunrise on November 15 comes at 6:45, or 19 minutes earlier than it does on Sunday, November 30 — the last day in the season.

A comparable loss in time occurs at sunset. On Saturday the sun will set at 4:21 compared to 4:10 on the last day of month. Added together and that’s a loss of 30 minutes in real time.

Will it make any difference in hunters’ success rate? Probably not.

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Planet Aid drop boxes unlikely to clothe locals

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At least one Planet Aid bin has already appeared in Orleans County.   This one is in Orleans near Village Pizza.  Photo by Tena Starr

At least one Planet Aid bin has already appeared in Orleans County. This one is in Orleans near Village Pizza. Photo by Tena Starr

copyright the Chronicle November 5, 2014 

by Natalie Hormilla

A convenient way to recycle clothing is making its way into Orleans and Essex counties — but it’s highly unlikely that any of those clothes will end up on the backs of needy people in the Northeast Kingdom, or even in the country.

Planet Aid is a nonprofit that puts out bins where anyone can deposit unwanted clothes, shoes, or bedding, no matter what condition they’re in. It moved into Vermont in 2009 or 2010, said Northern New England Operations Manager Patrick Holland in a telephone interview Friday from his office in Hudson, New Hampshire. But it’s just now moving north of St. Johnsbury.

Drop-off bins will be available in the next few weeks in Derby, Newport, Irasburg, Barton, Orleans, Norton, Canaan, Lyndonville, and Danville, at the recycling centers in Glover and Brighton, and at the Westmore transfer station.

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Conley is inducted into New England Pony Pullers Hall of Fame

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Doug Conley of Glover with Dan and King, his winning free-for-all team.  Mr. Conley was recently inducted into the New England Pony Pullers Hall of Fame.   Photo by Tena Starr

Doug Conley of Glover with Dan and King, his winning free-for-all team. Mr. Conley was recently inducted into the New England Pony Pullers Hall of Fame. Photo by Tena Starr

copyright the Chronicle October 29, 2014

by Tena Starr

GLOVER — Doug Conley was at home in Glover, laid up with a bad back, when he got a call from his friend Jake Randall, who was at what’s called the world championships for pony pulling.

Mr. Randall said: “You’ve just been inducted into the New England Pony Pullers Hall of Fame.”

“I thought he was lying,” Mr. Conley said.

He wasn’t. Both Mr. Randall and Mr. Conley’s wife, Judy, knew he was about to be inducted and had hoped to get him down to Massachusetts for the ceremony.

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Are hops making a comeback in Vermont?

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Local hops cones growing at Parker Pie in West Glover.  Photos by Aaron Dentel-Post

Local hops cones growing at Parker Pie in West Glover. Photos by Aaron Dentel-Post

copyright the Chronicle October 22, 2014

by Aaron Dentel-Post

In 1850, Vermont grew 8.2 percent of the nation’s hops, with Orleans County accounting for 77,605 pounds of the crop a year. The crop was so important that children were taken out of school at harvest time, and men took time off from their regular jobs.

But it was the women, according to Kurt Staudter, executive director of the Vermont Brewers Association and author of Vermont Beer, who were paid the most because they were gentler when picking the easily bruised cones of the plant.

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Lady Catamounts teach basketball fundamentals to local youth

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Erica Thaler of Glover learns to play the post from University of Vermont center Gracia Hutson.

Erica Thaler of Glover learns to play the post from University of Vermont center Gracia Hutson.  Photos by David Dudley

copyright the Chronicle October 15, 2014

by David Dudley

The University of Vermont’s (UVM) Lady Catamounts visited Lake Region Union High School Saturday to give a clinic on basketball fundamentals for children aged seven to 12.

When the Lady Catamounts arrived at the gym, there was already a handful of young players waiting. The clinic was taught by Kylie Atwood of Albany, Rachel Merrill, Gracia Hutson, Kylie Butler, Kristina White, and Assistant Coach Shannon Gholar.

While the Lady Catamounts come from far-flung places — New York, Arizona, Minnesota — it was a homecoming for Kylie Atwood, who graduated from Lake Region in 2012.

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