Brewfest brings in the bucks for cancer patients

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Justin Heller (right) and Tyler Howard (left) cooked for about 400 people on July 11 at Brewfest.  Mr. Howard manned the grill, and Mr. Heller was in charge of smoking meat, a task he started four days before the event.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Justin Heller (right) and Tyler Howard (left) cooked for about 400 people on July 11 at Brewfest. Mr. Howard manned the grill, and Mr. Heller was in charge of smoking meat, a task he started four days before the event. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle July 15, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

NEWPORT CENTER — Brewfest, a fund-raiser held Saturday for cancer patients, brought in about $12,000, said Dr. Leslie Lockridge of the Northeast Kingdom Hematology Oncology Clinic (NEKHO).

Sunshine, beer, barbecue, and music were the order of the day at Kingdom Brewing, where the event was held.

NEKHO staff and patients organized the Brewfest, which was aimed at raising money to fill the clinic’s patient fund once more.

Dr. Lockridge, who owns the clinic, said the money raised would have lasted a couple of years before, but now the number of patients has increased exponentially.

“I’ve been through six months of treatment, and you need an arsenal of things,” Mary Lee Daigle said. “Your whole system is turned upside down.”

Insurance doesn’t begin to cover all the costs a cancer patient can incur.… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Wheelock and Dartmouth connection explained

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Noah Manning welcomes Dartmouth College President Philip Hanlon to Miller’s Run School in Sheffield.  Jill (Tune) Faulkner (back, left), chairman of the Miller’s Run board, and Principal Sikander Rashid (back, right) paused from their work feeding the 50 or so local residents who turned out to meet President Hanlon, and listened to the Miller’s Run graduate speak.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Noah Manning welcomes Dartmouth College President Philip Hanlon to Miller’s Run School in Sheffield. Jill (Tune) Faulkner (back, left), chairman of the Miller’s Run board, and Principal Sikander Rashid (back, right) paused from their work feeding the 50 or so local residents who turned out to meet President Hanlon, and listened to the Miller’s Run graduate speak. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle July 15, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

SHEFFIELD — Noah Manning, a sophomore at Dartmouth College, brought a school friend home recently. He was Philip Hanlon, the president of Dartmouth. His visit to Miller’s Run School, where Mr. Manning got his early education, brought out a crowd for a community meal and a celebration of the link between an Ivy League school and a Northeast Kingdom town.

When Eleazer Wheelock founded Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, in 1769, he had a problem: His plan of educating native Americans and English missionaries was not calculated to bring in a great deal of money. He appealed to the Republic of Vermont for assistance, but aside from expressions of moral support, the Legislature offered little in the way of tangible support during his life.

John Wheelock, Eleazer’s son, became… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Island Pond swamped with visitors for July 4

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copyright the Chronicle July 1, 2015

Pictured is one of the flag-twirling majorettes in Les Éclairs, a marching band from Quebec that provided a highly polished performance during the Fourth of July celebration Saturday in Island Pond. Photo by Paul Lefebvre

copyright the Chronicle July 8, 2015

by Paul Lefebvre

ISLAND POND — More than fireworks sizzled and popped in this small town at the weekend’s celebration of the Fourth of July

The size of the crowd that turned out over the three days of festivities prompted one observer to remark that he didn’t realize that so many people knew where Island Pond was.

Beginning with Friday night’s fireworks and extending into Saturday’s parade with a Canadian marching band accompanied by a fleet of floats, decorated to celebrate America’s two-hundred thirty-ninth birthday, Island Pond sparkled day and night.

The first wave of revelers appeared at the weekly Friday Night Live, an open air dance at the Pavilion Park, that includes… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Cornucopia graduates two

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Pictured here on the left, Renée Swain, executive director of Umbrella, which started the Cornucopia program, spoke at the graduation ceremony for Heidi Massi (right) on Thursday. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Pictured here on the left, Renée Swain, executive director of Umbrella, which started the Cornucopia program, spoke at the graduation ceremony for Heidi Massi (right) on Thursday. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle July 8, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

 

NEWPORT — Heidi Massi of Barton is one of two students who graduated from the 17-week Cornucopia cooking program on Thursday. Now she can make all kinds of yummy treats, including the focaccia, pizza, and chocolate mousse she made for her graduation party.

Her fellow graduate, Marissa Wheeler, wasn’t available to attend the party.

Cornucopia aims to build marketable skills and confidence in women who are going through a tough transition in their lives.

That could mean almost anything — from leaving an abusive relationship to looking for a career change, said Renée Swain, executive director at Umbrella, the organization that started Cornucopia. Umbrella works with victims of domestic violence.

“Economic independence is a key ingredient for success,” Ms. Swain said.

The program is the culinary equivalent of… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Relay for Life: Over 400 join the fight against cancer

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The American Cancer Society’s Northeast Kingdom edition of Relay for Life took place in Newport on Saturday night.  Luminarias commemorating cancer victims and survivors were placed along the track at North Country Union High School and lit at nightfall.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

The American Cancer Society’s Northeast Kingdom edition of Relay for Life took place in Newport on Saturday night. Luminarias commemorating cancer victims and survivors were placed along the track at North Country Union High School and lit at nightfall. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle July 1, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

NEWPORT — The luminaria-lined track at North Country Union High School (NCUHS) was filled with people of all ages talking and laughing Saturday night as they walked to raise money to fight cancer.

Ice-filled kiddie pools at either end of the track kept water bottles cold so participants could rehydrate during their trek.

By Saturday morning 323 people had signed up for the American Cancer Society’s 12-hour Relay for Life in advance. In the evening, 89 more signed up in person, and others came to walk without signing in, or simply to buy a luminaria bag. The relay lasts all night.

People who are signed up are grouped into teams. Thirty-five teams raised…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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World War II vet receives a letter from the Queen

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Donald Wheatley, formerly of Glover, received best wishes from Queen Elizabeth II for his service in World War II.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Donald Wheatley, formerly of Glover, received best wishes from Queen Elizabeth II for his service in World War II. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle July 1, 2015

by Tena Starr

NEWPORT — World War II veteran Donald Wheatley, formerly of Glover, received an unusual honor last week. Queen Elizabeth II of England sent him her best wishes and a photograph of herself.

A letter from the Queen’s lady-in-waiting was presented to Mr. Wheatley at Bel-Aire Quality Care Nursing Center in Newport on Wednesday, June 24.

“Donald has a rather illustrious and interesting past that caught Her Majesty’s attention,” said Sharon Campbell of Island Pond.

Ms. Campbell is originally from England…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Energetic senior citizen powers the new Glover meal site

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Gloria Powers pauses in the middle of cleaning the kitchen in the Glover Town Hall in preparation for the opening of the new Glover senior meal site on June 29.  From left to right are her granddaughter Brittany Marsh, honorary granddaughter Chelsea Pulver, Gloria Powers, and her daughter Kristi Powers, who is also Brittany's mother.  Ms. Pulver will also help cook and serve at the meal site.  Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Gloria Powers pauses in the middle of cleaning the kitchen in the Glover Town Hall in preparation for the opening of the new Glover senior meal site on June 29. From left to right are her granddaughter Brittany Marsh, honorary granddaughter Chelsea Pulver, Gloria Powers, and her daughter Kristi Powers, who is also Brittany’s mother. Ms. Pulver will also help cook and serve at the meal site. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle June 24, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

GLOVER — Gloria Powers never stands still. At 70 years old, she is a tiny dynamo of a woman who simply exudes energy. And right now, she’s a woman with a mission.

On Monday, June 29, Ms. Powers will serve up the first meals at the new senior meal site in the basement of the town hall here, and she still has a lot to do.

She is approaching the project with relish.

Last Friday morning, with just ten days to go before opening, she was busy cleaning and organizing the kitchen where she will cook the weekly senior meals. The menus were planned and the food donations were in the freezer….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Craftsbury Academy graduation: Lieutenant Governor was featured speaker

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Craftsbury graduates celebrate the end of their high school careers in a traditional fashion.   Photo by Joseph Gresser

Craftsbury graduates celebrate the end of their high school careers in a traditional fashion. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle June 17, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

CRAFTSBURY COMMON — Craftsbury Academy graduated a class of 17 students Friday, June 12.  Looking at her seniors seated near her on the stage in the school’s new gymnasium, Principal Merri Greenia smiled broadly as she made a clear political statement.

“When small schools work, they work best,” she said.

After a legislative session that placed the state’s smaller school districts squarely in the crosshairs of budget cutters, Ms. Greenia’s message was unmistakable.

And Craftsbury’s Class of 2015 had every right to feel pride in their school and their own accomplishments.  Almost half the graduating class was National Honor Society members….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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At the Lake Region graduation: “You can take the raccoon out of the wild, but….”

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As part of Lake Region Union High School’s graduation ceremony, graduates must give a white rose to someone who has stood by them in their journey.  Pictured here, MaKayla Baraw (right) gives a rose to her brother Hazen Baraw (left).  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

As part of Lake Region Union High School’s graduation ceremony, graduates must give a white rose to someone who has stood by them in their journey. Pictured here, MaKayla Baraw (right) gives a rose to her brother Hazen Baraw (left). Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle June 17, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

The Lake Region Union High School Class of 2015 graduated on Sunday in a beautiful ceremony filled with parting advice, comedy, and music. There were 81 graduates.

Devin Royer gave the student address and compared the Class of 2015 to his pet raccoon. It was lovable, but sometimes you had to throw a laundry basket over it to control its wild side.

He looked towards the laughing teachers, who were seated to the right of the stage for confirmation that they sometimes wished they could have thrown a basket over this year’s graduating class.

He recalled advice teachers had given him. For example, cheating is like pregnancy.….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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World War II veterans gather on the anniversary of D-Day

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Joe Queenin of Derby Line holds up a Japanese flag, which was folded inside the helmet of the Japanese soldier he killed during the war.  The flag is covered with wishes for a safe return, hand-written by friends and family of the young soldier.   Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Joe Queenin of Derby Line holds up a Japanese flag, which was folded inside the helmet of the Japanese soldier he killed during the war. The flag is covered with wishes for a safe return, hand-written by friends and family of the young soldier. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle June 10, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

NEWPORT — They came walking upright, leaning on canes, or struggling with walkers, holding in their hands treasured memorabilia from over 70 years ago.  Seventeen World War II veterans — 16 men and one woman, ranging in age from their late eighties through mid-nineties — assembled at the Goodrich Memorial Library in Newport Saturday to mark the anniversary of the allied invasion of Normandy, France.

The event was organized and hosted by Scott Wheeler, owner and editor of Vermont’s Northland Journal, along with his wife, Penny, and daughter Emily. Over 60 people attended, including the veterans, their families, and members of the community.

“I came to mingle with the other vets and remember the occasion,” said 93-year-old Lindy Palin.  “I was reliving a few missions this morning….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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