In Orleans: Fenton, 94, gets new medals

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Robert Fenton of Orleans shows off a row of medals reissued to him by the Department of Veterans Affairs. Mr. Fenton earned the medals over his years of service in World War II and the Korean War.  American Legion Post 23 presented him with the replacement medals to Mr. Fenton at Monday’s Memorial Day service in Orleans.   Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Robert Fenton of Orleans shows off a row of medals reissued to him by the Department of Veterans Affairs. Mr. Fenton earned the medals over his years of service in World War II and the Korean War. American Legion Post 23 presented him with the replacement medals to Mr. Fenton at Monday’s Memorial Day service in Orleans. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle May 27, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

ORLEANS — Thirty years ago, Robert Fenton’s military medals went missing. The 94-year-old Mr. Fenton, who is from Orleans, is a veteran of both World War II and the Korean War.

On Monday, at a Memorial Day ceremony in Orleans, American Legion Post #23 presented Mr. Fenton with a duplicate set of medals, reissued by the Department of Veterans Affairs.

“I’m going to put ’em in the bank vault this time,” Mr. Fenton said happily a few minutes after the row of medals was pinned to his chest.

The medals were a U.S. Army Good Conduct Medal, a….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Peters still holds CDL at 95

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Bill Peters' children recently gave him a plaque, honoring him for possibly being the oldest man in Vermont who still holds a CDL.  He's 95, and was a longtime road commissioner in Albany.   Photo by Tena Starr

Bill Peters’ children recently gave him a plaque, honoring him for possibly being the oldest man in Vermont who still holds a CDL. He’s 95, and was a longtime road commissioner in Albany. Photo by Tena Starr

copyright the Chronicle May 27, 2015

by Tena Starr  

NORTH HYDE PARK — Former Albany Road Commissioner Bill Peters could well be the oldest man in Vermont who still holds a CDL. That’s a commercial driver’s license, which, among other things, allows a person to drive the big trucks that maintain town roads.

Mr. Peters’ children recently presented their father with a plaque that says: “Congratulations on being the oldest person we could find that still has a CDL and medical card in the state of Vermont. Turned 95 on March 31, 2015. We are proud of you.”

The plaque was the idea of Mr. Peters’ son Donald.

He said he was out shoveling snow in March and thought, what do you get a man who’s 95?….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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contact Tena Starr at tenas@bartonchronicle.com

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Wheatley remembers World War II

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Donald Wheatley served in the Army during World War II.  Here he poses with a picture of his outfit during the war, of which he is the last living member. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Donald Wheatley served in the Army during World War II. Here he poses with a picture of his outfit during the war, of which he is the last living member. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle May 20, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

NEWPORT — At 93, Donald Wheatley has witnessed most of the major events of the twentieth century, and participated in a big one, World War II.

“I’m 93 years young,” he said in an interview Friday. “I say that seriously. I’m only 93.”

His sister is 96 and still drives, and his father’s mind stayed sharp until he died at 106, Mr. Wheatley said.

None of the members of Mr. Wheatley’s Army outfit were casualties of war, but 70 years after the end of World War II, he is the last surviving member of his company.

“They say 1,000 World War II veterans die every day,” he said.…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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In Newport: “Downton Abbey” comes to the Goodrich library

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Helene Lang of Shelburne, appearing in the persona of children’s author Beatrix Potter, was the guest speaker at the tea. Her performance, called “Beatrix Potter Revisited,” is sponsored by the Vermont Humanities Council with a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.  The famous children’s author lived at the same time as the characters of “Downton Abbey.”  Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Helene Lang of Shelburne, appearing in the persona of children’s author Beatrix Potter, was the guest speaker at the tea. Her performance, called “Beatrix Potter Revisited,” is sponsored by the Vermont Humanities Council with a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The famous children’s author lived at the same time as the characters of “Downton Abbey.” Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle May 13, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

NEWPORT — It could have been a scene from England between the wars.  In the kitchen, maids in lacy white pinafores laid out trays of iced cookies, thinly sliced cake, and cucumber sandwiches on triangles of thin bread — crusts cut off, of course.  Out in the grand dining room, about 45 guests in their finest hats and gloves admired elegant table settings and chatted with friends while they waited for their tea to be served.

The event was the Goodrich Memorial Library’s “Downton Abbey” Tea, held on Saturday afternoon in the elegant upstairs rooms of Newport’s historic library.  With its grand staircase, high ceilings, and carved paneling, the 1899 library building was the perfect setting for a step back in time.  The library has held fancy teas for a number of years — first a mother’s tea, then a senior’s tea, and for the past two years, the “Downton Abbey” tea….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Les Misérables comes to Orleans

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Katie Kelly, playing the young Cosette, sings “Castle on a Cloud” in the first act of Les Misérables.  The show was put together as part of the Vermont Family Theatre.  Photos by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Katie Kelly, playing the young Cosette, sings “Castle on a Cloud” in the first act of Les Misérables. The show was put together as part of the Vermont Family Theatre. Photos by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle May 6, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

ORLEANS — The cast of Vermont Family Theatre’s Les Misérables nailed the opening night of their show on Friday, remembering every line and singing every note.

Friday was the first of a three-day run of the show, put together by Artistic Director Karen Perry.

It was obvious that all the actors loved the show and gave it their all. The choruses were excellent and very effective, moving the story forward and making hearts race.

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Actors share addiction experience with high school kids

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Left to right, Shahjehan Khan, Elizabeth Addison, and Dennis Staroselsky perform the first version of the designated driving skit at North Country Union High School to raise awareness.  Mr. Staroselsky plays the drunk driver who ends up crashing his car, killing himself and his two friends. Photos by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Left to right, Shahjehan Khan, Elizabeth Addison, and Dennis Staroselsky perform the first version of the designated driving skit at North Country Union High School to raise awareness. Mr. Staroselsky plays the drunk driver who ends up crashing his car, killing himself and his two friends. Photos by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle April 29, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

NEWPORT — “I couldn’t possibly have a problem because I don’t like cocaine, I just like how it smells,” is one of the edgy jokes the Improbable Players, a Boston theater troupe, used to raise awareness about drug and alcohol abuse at North Country Union High School (NCUHS) on Tuesday.

The teens attending oohed and aahed and laughed often as the troupe performed on stage in the auditorium.

The initial skits were followed by a play and a question and answer period when the students could ask the actors anything that came to mind.

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Homeopathy reflects a gentler model of parenting

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Local homeopathic practitioner Judy Jarvis spoke at the Greensboro Public Library on April 16 on the subject of using homeopathic remedies and essential oils for children's health. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Local homeopathic practitioner Judy Jarvis spoke at the Greensboro Public Library on April 16 on the subject of using homeopathic remedies and essential oils for children’s health. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle April 22, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

GREENSBORO — Most of the five women who came to the Greensboro library on Thursday evening knew one another well, giving the gathering an intimate feeling. The occasion was a talk by Judy Jarvis, a homeopathic practitioner, about using homeopathic remedies and essential oils on children. Each of the mothers arrived with questions, mostly about specific issues they were experiencing in their families — a baby with a cold, a growing child with leg cramps, a preteen having trouble falling asleep, a teenager under stress.

However, the first question, asked by Virginia LaPierre, a mother of five children ranging in age from four to 13, was more basic.

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Raising Thoreau’s cabin to life

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North Country Career Center student Evan Daigle fits a tenon into a mortise on the roof of the Thoreau cabin replica.  All the logs made by the forestry students fit into the planned design, except for one.  Photos by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

North Country Career Center student Evan Daigle fits a tenon into a mortise on the roof of the Thoreau cabin replica. All the logs made by the forestry students fit into the planned design, except for one. Photos by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle April 15, 2015 

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

DERBY — The smell of fresh wood and the noise of tools at work greeted anyone walking into North Country Career Center’s (NCCC) woodshop class on Thursday. Students were hard at work at the Harold J. Haynes Memorial Land Lab, assembling a timber frame cabin — designed by someone who’s been dead for over 150 years.

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Lussiers leave the Craftsbury Vibrations after 40 years

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Bernie and Linda Lussier of the Craftsbury Vibrations in front of their music library. They will perform in Hyde Park on April 11 at 1:30 p.m. for the last time — probably.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Bernie and Linda Lussier of the Craftsbury Vibrations in front of their music library. They will perform in Hyde Park on April 12 at 1:30 p.m. for the last time — probably. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle April 8, 2015 

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

CRAFTSBURY — Bernie Lussier and his wife, Linda, have been playing and singing together as members of the Craftsbury Vibrations for over 40 years, but after their gig on Sunday, April 12, at 1:30 p.m. in Hyde Park, they will call a halt to their professional careers. The name of the band will depart with them.

In a recent interview, Mr. Lussier explained that a single show could take eight hours with four hours spent setting up and packing, and another four hours standing up singing and playing.

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New Village Pizza brings back old menu

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Ryan Lewis and Marcia Brown are the new Village Pizza owners. The restaurant is now called Lewis Village Pizza and brings back the old substation menu with a few additions.  Photos by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Ryan Lewis and Marcia Brown are the new Village Pizza owners. The restaurant is now called Lewis Village Pizza and brings back the old substation menu with a few additions. Photos by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle April 1, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

DERBY — Companions Ryan Lewis and Marcia Brown bought Derby’s Village Pizza two months ago. After a month of renovations, the restaurant, now called Lewis Village Pizza, is open again.

“I always told people that one of these days this is what I was going to do,” Mr. Lewis said Tuesday.

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