Norrie pleads guilty to O’Hagan murder

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Michael Norrie is brought into court.  He pled guilty to murdering Mary Pat O’Hagan.  Photo by Todd Wellington courtesy of the Caledonian-Record

Michael Norrie is brought into court. He pled guilty to murdering Mary Pat O’Hagan. Photo by Todd Wellington courtesy of the Caledonian-Record

copyright the Chronicle July 22, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

ST. JOHNSBURY — The man who pulled the trigger admitted his role in the murder of Mary Pat O’Hagan Tuesday. Michael Norrie, 24, of Sheffield stood in the courtroom of the Criminal Division of Caledonia County Superior Court and pled guilty to burglary, kidnapping, and first degree murder in Mrs. O’Hagan’s death in 2010.

His plea was part of an agreement with prosecutors that, if accepted by Judge Robert Bent, will see Mr. Norrie spend 23 years of a 23-year-to-50-year sentence in prison. When released he will be on indefinite probation unless released by the court, the agreement states.

First degree murder carries a penalty of up to…

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Local history buffs present work

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Pictured from left, Joan Alexander of the Glover Historical Society, writer Dolores E. Chamberlain, and Earl Randall of the Crystal Lake Falls Historical Association were the presenters on Monday night at a meeting on local history at the Barton library.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Pictured from left, Joan Alexander of the Glover Historical Society, writer Dolores E. Chamberlain, and Earl Randall of the Crystal Lake Falls Historical Association were the presenters on Monday night at a meeting on local history at the Barton library. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle July 22, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

BARTON — The area here changed drastically in the last century. Where Barton was a hub of activity, now the industry is gone and once-busy factory buildings are crumbling.

This was part of the focus of Earl Randall’s presentation on Barton’s history, which he gave at the library here on Monday. About ten people came to the meeting, to hear from different presenters about the stories, people, and general history of the area.

Mr. Randall, of the Crystal Lake Falls Historical Association, Joan Alexander of the Glover Historical Society, and writer Dolores E. Chamberlain presented the work they’ve done on the area to keep memories alive.

Mr. Randall brought old pictures of Barton and used a pointer to bring attention to different businesses that were once here, what happened to them, and what replaced them.

What made Barton the economic and social center of Orleans County were…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Arts guild plans paint out in Newport

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Pictured here with the dolls that she makes is Camilla Mead, president of the Wooden Horse Arts Guild.  The guild aims to build the local community through the arts and provide a space for artists to come together.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Pictured here with the dolls that she makes is Camilla Mead, president of the Wooden Horse Arts Guild. The guild aims to build the local community through the arts and provide a space for artists to come together. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle July 22, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

NORTH TROY — The Wooden Horse Arts Guild, or WHAG, is adding a new event to the Aquafest in Newport on August 1: a plein air paint out. Artists can bring their materials and paint outdoors during the festival.

The live painting initiative is one of many activities WHAG organizes in order to benefit both the community and local artists.

Artists have few options if they want to display their work and sell it. A common one is having a gallery display the art in exchange for a commission on a sale, sometimes as much as 50 percent of the sale price.

WHAG gives artists and crafters an alternative. The nonprofit guild doesn’t require a commission, and its permanent gallery is located online.

For $50 a year, artists get their own webpage on the WHAG website, complete with…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Hill Farmstead expands, adds tasting room

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The view from the Hill Farmstead tasting room shows the brewing floor, with Mr. Hill at his post in the center of the operation. At left are the four tanks in which malt, water, and hops are cooked together. At right are rows of fermenting and conditioning tanks. At the far end of the building is the station at which kegs are filled. The entire operation is tied together with an elaborate system of pipes that run across the room’s ceiling.

copyright the Chronicle July 22, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

GREENSBORO — When the Chronicle first visited Shaun Hill in 2010, he was brewing beer in a converted garage. It would be a few months before he released his first offerings, but Mr. Hill already had serious ambition.

“My goal is to make the best beer in the world,” he said.

He looked forward to expanding his production facility to the size of the barn that once stood on the property where he makes his beer, land that has been in his family for well over 200 years.

Three years later Hill Farmstead Brewery was recognized as…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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New state park opens overlooking Willoughby Lake

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Windsor and Florence Wright stand in front of the stone outline of the original farmhouse on Hinton Hill Road where their family once spent its summers.   The Wrights, who now live outside of Kansas City, Kansas, donated the 356-acre parcel of land in Westmore  to create Sentinel Rock State Park.  Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Windsor and Florence Wright stand in front of the stone outline of the original farmhouse on Hinton Hill Road where their family once spent its summers. The Wrights, who now live outside of Kansas City, Kansas, donated the 356-acre parcel of land in Westmore to create Sentinel Rock State Park. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle July 15, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

WESTMORE — About 13,000 years ago, the last retreating glacier left a huge boulder, twice as tall as a person, overlooking Lake Willoughby near the top of the Hinton Hill Road in Westmore. Generations have watched sunsets from the rock, picnicked at its base, and gathered berries in the surrounding fields.

On July 11 the great rock, and the site of the old farmhouse that once stood nearby, became the focal points of Vermont’s new Sentinel Rock State Park.

Vermont’s newest state park was made possible by the generous gift of 356 acres by Windsor and Florence Wright. The Wrights summered in an old Victorian farmhouse on the site for decades after Mr. Wright’s father bought the place in 1947, said Vermont State Parks Director Craig Whipple….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Newport City throws Ward a farewell party

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John Ward and a double stand at a party honoring Newport’s City Manager, who officially retired on July 15.  The 50 or so guests had a hard time telling which was the real John Ward, especially since both candidates were dressed in his clothing.  Perhaps Mr. Ward’s administrative assistant, Laurel Wilson, could have resolved the question, but she was unaccountably absent when the second Mr. Ward strolled into the room.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

John Ward and a double stand at a party honoring Newport’s City Manager, who officially retired on July 15. The 50 or so guests had a hard time telling which was the real John Ward, especially since both candidates were dressed in his clothing. Perhaps Mr. Ward’s administrative assistant, Laurel Wilson, could have resolved the question, but she was unaccountably absent when the second Mr. Ward strolled into the room. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle July 15, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

NEWPORT — Wednesday, July 15, is the last day on the job for Newport City Manager John Ward Jr., who is winding up his 16-year run and preparing for retirement.

“I’m grateful for the job, otherwise I probably would have had to leave Newport,” he said in an interview at the Newport Municipal Building July 9.

For a lifetime resident of a city that he clearly loves, that would have been a tough burden to bear, but after the city council’s original choice for the job decided not to accept it, Mr. Ward was tapped. Paul Monette and Richard Baraw, two of the aldermen who voted to make him city manager in March 1999, continued to serve on the council for most of Mr. Ward’s service.

Mr. Monette is now mayor, and Mr. Baraw….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Brewfest brings in the bucks for cancer patients

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Justin Heller (right) and Tyler Howard (left) cooked for about 400 people on July 11 at Brewfest.  Mr. Howard manned the grill, and Mr. Heller was in charge of smoking meat, a task he started four days before the event.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Justin Heller (right) and Tyler Howard (left) cooked for about 400 people on July 11 at Brewfest. Mr. Howard manned the grill, and Mr. Heller was in charge of smoking meat, a task he started four days before the event. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle July 15, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

NEWPORT CENTER — Brewfest, a fund-raiser held Saturday for cancer patients, brought in about $12,000, said Dr. Leslie Lockridge of the Northeast Kingdom Hematology Oncology Clinic (NEKHO).

Sunshine, beer, barbecue, and music were the order of the day at Kingdom Brewing, where the event was held.

NEKHO staff and patients organized the Brewfest, which was aimed at raising money to fill the clinic’s patient fund once more.

Dr. Lockridge, who owns the clinic, said the money raised would have lasted a couple of years before, but now the number of patients has increased exponentially.

“I’ve been through six months of treatment, and you need an arsenal of things,” Mary Lee Daigle said. “Your whole system is turned upside down.”

Insurance doesn’t begin to cover all the costs a cancer patient can incur.… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Wheelock and Dartmouth connection explained

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Noah Manning welcomes Dartmouth College President Philip Hanlon to Miller’s Run School in Sheffield.  Jill (Tune) Faulkner (back, left), chairman of the Miller’s Run board, and Principal Sikander Rashid (back, right) paused from their work feeding the 50 or so local residents who turned out to meet President Hanlon, and listened to the Miller’s Run graduate speak.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Noah Manning welcomes Dartmouth College President Philip Hanlon to Miller’s Run School in Sheffield. Jill (Tune) Faulkner (back, left), chairman of the Miller’s Run board, and Principal Sikander Rashid (back, right) paused from their work feeding the 50 or so local residents who turned out to meet President Hanlon, and listened to the Miller’s Run graduate speak. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle July 15, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

SHEFFIELD — Noah Manning, a sophomore at Dartmouth College, brought a school friend home recently. He was Philip Hanlon, the president of Dartmouth. His visit to Miller’s Run School, where Mr. Manning got his early education, brought out a crowd for a community meal and a celebration of the link between an Ivy League school and a Northeast Kingdom town.

When Eleazer Wheelock founded Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, in 1769, he had a problem: His plan of educating native Americans and English missionaries was not calculated to bring in a great deal of money. He appealed to the Republic of Vermont for assistance, but aside from expressions of moral support, the Legislature offered little in the way of tangible support during his life.

John Wheelock, Eleazer’s son, became… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Alan Greenleaf and the Doctor July 18

Alan Greenleaf (right) and the Doctor, Jonathan Kaplan (left), will play at the Music Box in Craftsbury on July 18.  Photo courtesy of the Music Box

Alan Greenleaf (right) and the Doctor, Jonathan Kaplan (left), will play at the Music Box in Craftsbury on July 18. Photo courtesy of the Music Box

A bit of farm life and life in the Northeast Kingdom in song will be heard at the Music Box in Craftsbury on Saturday, July 18 at 8 p.m., with Alan Greenleaf and the Doctor.

Mr. Greenleaf lives on the farm he has worked for a good part of his life in northern Vermont. His songs are inspired by his life on his farm and the people and countryside around him. They are a report of events, people, feelings, and observations of his life experiences, with a great deal of poetic license. Living in Vermont, the weather and seasons play a significant part in his stories. Musically, he draws on many American traditions, including country, Appalachian, blues and jazz. His newest CD, Songs from Lost Mountain, is now available.

Mr. Greenleaf is joined by “the Doctor,” piano player Jonathan Kaplan. The two have been playing together for over a dozen years. Mr. Kaplan is a classically trained pianist who fell in love with the blues and old-time traditional music. Together they bring a wide variety of original ballads, rhythm and blues with moving melodies. Listen to some of their tunes at alangreenleaf.com.

For more information, call 586-7533 or themusicboxvt.org. — from the Music Box.

For more things to do, see Things to Do in the Northeast Kingdom.

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Obituaries July 15, 2015

obit BennettJoanne “Joanie” Bennett

Joanne “Joanie” Bennett, 80, of Derby died peacefully on July 4, 2015, in Newport.

She was born on March 14, 1935, in Deep River, Connecticut, to George and Louise (Salzgeber) Atwood.

On September 9, 1961, she married Francis “Bud” Bennett Jr., who predeceased her on September 17, 2010.

During her lifetime, she was a plane spotter, made parachute cords, drove the school bus, was the first woman lister in Lowell, and was on the North Country Union High School board. She also served on Coutts-Moriarty’s board and worked at North Country Hospital in the dietary department.

She is survived by her children: Penni Pomeroy and her husband, Theodore, of Sagamore, Massachusetts, Michael Bennett and his wife, Cathy, of West Charleston, and Patricia Bennett of Derby; and by her grandchildren, whom she dearly loved and loved having them come for visits: Amanda, Abigail, Brandon, Brian, and Sarah.

She was predeceased by her brother William Atwood.

A graveside service was held on July 11, at the Derby Center Cemetery in Derby.

Should friends desire, contributions in her memory may be made to the Dailey Memorial Library, 101 Junior High Drive, Derby, Vermont 05829.

Online condolences at curtis-britch.com.

obit burgessPriscilla Doreen (McKinney) Burgess

Priscilla Doreen (McKinney) Burgess, 70, died early Thursday morning, July 9, 2015, at her home in Enfield, New Hampshire, after a long and courageous battle with cancer.

She was born on August 26, 1944, in Island Pond, daughter of Earl T. and Dorothy Mary (Boutin) McKinney.

Her family moved from Island Pond to Thetford when she was in the fifth grade. When she entered seventh grade her family moved again, this time to White River Junction, where she attended Hartford High School. She left school before graduation but would later, along with several of her siblings, complete her education and receive her GED.

Following the death of her first husband, Nelson Picard, she married William Burgess Jr. on October 25, 1969, and they made their home in Enfield. Ms. Burgess completed some college courses and became a phlebotomist. She worked for many years in the blood laboratory at Alice Peck Day Hospital in Lebanon, New Hampshire. When she left the hospital she stayed at home as a single mom to raise her five children. To help make ends meet she did upholstery work for the Paint and Paper Barn in West Lebanon, New Hampshire. She also did a fair amount of babysitting. She worked for ten years at the senior center in Lebanon, and later for Life Line. She loved older people. She also loved to hunt, fish, camp, garden, and was an awesome seamstress and a very talented wedding cake maker.

She is survived by her husband, Bill Burgess of Enfield; three sons: Tate Picard and his wife, Lynn, of Enfield, Nelson Picard and his wife, Thelma, of Houston, Texas, and William Burgess III of Beaumont, Texas; two daughters: Sherrie Ruel of Enfield, and Stacey McIntyre of Sutton, New Hampshire; nine grandchildren: Emily, Jessica, Aaron, Tyler, Tanner, Andrew, Cameron, Devin, and Hunter; two brothers: Lawrence McKinney of Wilder, and Bruce McKinney of White River Junction; four sisters: Patricia Belisle of Hartland, Charlotte Lyman of White River Junction, Bonnie Vitagliano of White River Junction, and Alice Whitney of Quechee; and by many nieces and nephews.

She was predeceased by five brothers: Thomas McKinney Sr., Earl McKinney, Ronald McKinney, William McKinney, and Richard McKinney; her son-in-law Mark Ruel; and by a grandson, Kyle Wilson.

Calling hours will be held on Wednesday, July 15, from 6 to 8 p.m., at the Knight Funeral Home in White River Junction.

Memorial contributions may be made to a special fund that helps the volunteers in the chemotherapy department at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, 1 Medical Center Drive, Lebanon, New Hampshire.

Online condolences at knightfuneralhomes.com.

obit CarrJames Carr

James Carr, 84, of Derby died on Monday, July 6, 2015, at North Country Hospital in Newport with his wife, Gabrielle, at his side, following a long period of declining health due to Alzheimer’s disease.

He was born on December 24, 1930, in Washington, D.C., son of James and Victoria (Esposito) Carr.

He was employed at North Country Hospital for three decades as a purchasing agent until his retirement in 2000. He had many personal and community interests. He enjoyed golfing, gardening, boating, and vacationing in Florida with a large group of friends from the Newport area. He was a member of the Newport Rotary Club, serving as president for one year, and was always available to assist in various community fund-raising activities.

He is survived by Gabrielle, his wife of 38 years whom he married at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in 1977. He also leaves three children: James and his wife, Susan, of Salem, New York, John and his wife, Millicent, of North Little Rock, Arkansas, and Jane and her husband, Wesley Dintaman, of La Plata, Maryland; his granddaughters: Jennifer Zeglin of Washington, D.C., and Jessica Carr of Salem; his great-grandchildren: Noah and Julia Zeglin; and by his sisters-in-law: Pierrette Paradis, Denise Bouffard, Lucille Gaudreau, and Suzanne Gaudreau.

He was predeceased by his sister Frances, and a brother-in-law, Andre Gaudreau.

Mr. Carr was a devout and faithful communicant at St. Mary’s Parish in Newport. A Mass of Christian burial was celebrated on July 14 at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Newport.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in his memory to Mater Dei Parish in Newport.

Online condolences at curtis-britch.com.

obit DayNancy Joan Day

Nancy Joan Day, 72, of Newport died in Newport on July 5, 2015.

She was born on June 4, 1943, to Stanley Buskiski and Lucy Benin.

She was a member of the Newport Elks #2155. She and her husband, Charlie, enjoyed traveling, and she also enjoyed traveling to Florida to see her daughter in the winter. She was a person who enjoyed talking to friends and was very comfortable with strangers who soon became her friends. She and her husband spent many wonderful years together.

She is survived by her husband, Charles Hussain, of Newport; her children: Susan White and her husband, Richard, of New York, and Michelle Pagan and her husband, Hector, of Florida; her grandchildren: Richard and Connor White of New York, and John Pagan of Florida; two cousins: John Vaitkunas and his wife, Jane, and Patricia Wilson and her husband, Edward; her nieces and nephews: Saundra and Jonathan Wilson, and Katrina, John, and Samantha; and by her very good friends: Steve and Carman Vincent, and Manon Perrault and Sonny Sloan.

Funeral services were held in Newport on July 9. Burial will take place in New York.

Should friends desire, contributions in her memory may be made to the Hope Lodge, 237 East Avenue, Burlington, Vermont 05401.

Online condolences at curtis-britch.com.

obit dewittSteven H. DeWitt

Steven H. DeWitt, 43, of Holden, Massachusetts, died on Sunday, July 5, 2015, at the UMass Memorial Medical Center in Worcester, Massachusetts.

He was born on October 21, 1971, and raised in Holden, the son of Richard H. and Georgianna (Angelo) DeWitt.

He graduated from Wachusett Regional High School in 1989, and from Unity College with a major in conservation law enforcement in 1992. He worked for the Holden Department of Public Works for 22 years. He was also a second-generation on-call firefighter for the town of Holden. He was stationed for 21 years at the Chaffin Firehouse where he was the primary engineer of Engine 3. He was a member of the Nimrod Club of Holden, the Holden Association of Firefighters, the Massachusetts Call/Volunteer Firefighters’ Association, and American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees Local 806.

Mr. DeWitt was a lifelong outdoorsman, and an avid hunter and fisherman. He was happiest when he was doing these things with his father, kids, and dear friends at the family camp in Craftsbury. He very much enjoyed doing these things with his three children; they loved learning from their dad and he loved teaching them about these activities he had a lifelong love and respect for.

He will be lovingly missed by his wife of 20 years, Jennifer H. (Cross) DeWitt; his three children: Ethan, Owen, and Molly DeWitt; a brother, Christopher M. Angelo, of Northborough, Massachusetts; his mother, Georgianna (Angelo) DeWitt; his two sisters: Nicholette Cunningham and her husband, Alvin, of Fairfield, California, and Melissa A. Wackell of Leicester, Massachusetts; and by several nieces and nephews.

He was predeceased by his father, Richard H. DeWitt.

A funeral service honoring his life was held on July 11 in Holden.

In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to the DeWitt Family Educational Fund, care of Leominster Credit Union, 715 Main Street, Holden, Massachusetts 01520.

Online condolences at milesfuneralhome.com.

Roland Emile Duchesneau

Roland Duchesneau, 82, of Palm City, Florida, died on July 4, 2015, following a long illness.

He was born on February 1, 1932, in Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts. During the mid-1940s, the Duchesneau family moved to Barton, where they operated a dairy farm for many years.

After graduating from Sacred Heart High School, he moved to Manchester, New Hampshire, where he met and married Alice Houle in 1952. After a few years they moved their family to Burlington, and then to Barton, where he was employed by DONVAC Construction for several years. Eventually they purchased and operated the Blue Grille Restaurant in Barton. He went on to work for Union Butterfield’s in Derby Line for many years.

He always took great pride in his small farm in Barton raising heifers and pigs as well as working in his vegetable gardens. He was also an avid Red Sox fan.

In 1994, they retired to Palm City. Each Christmas, Mr. Duchesneau looked forward to his favorite food, maple syrup, to arrive from Vermont.

He will be missed by his children: Mark of Providence, Rhode Island, David of Palm City, Philip and his wife, Beverly, of Albany, and Annette and her husband, Doug Sparks, of Gladstone, Oregon. He also leaves his sisters: Irene Duchesneau and Annette Mulcahy of Colchester; as well as his grandchildren: Mark Jr., Kerry, Aaron, Katie, and Jordon Duchesneau, and Blake Sparks.

He was predeceased by his wife, Alice; his parents, Eugene and Adrienne Duchesneau; and by his sister Claire Vachon.

Mr. Duchesneau requested no services. He will be laid to rest beside his wife at the Pine Grove Cemetery in Manchester.

Linda Derick Laflam

Linda Derick Laflam, 71, of Sunrise, Florida, died peacefully at her home on June 27, 2015, with her loving sons by her side, after a courageous battle with cancer.

She was born on August 5, 1943, in Newport, to Leonard Derick and Adele (Gage) Derick. She attended Newport schools and went on to cosmetology school in Burlington, where she lived and worked for years before moving to Florida, where she continued to work up until her illness. She enjoyed her many colleagues and the relationships she formed with them over the years.

She is survived by her stepmother, Phyllis Gray Derick, of Newport; her sons: Todd and Troy Laflam of Sunrise; her granddaughter Celina Herz Laflam of Germany; her sister Deborah Derick Greenwood and her husband, Glenn, of Bradenton, Florida; her brothers: Michael Derick and his wife, Margaret, and Robert Derick of Newport; her nieces and nephews, and many cousins; and by good friends: Zaida Rojas and her son Gabriel, and Sigrid Kirchner Laflam of Germany.

She was predeceased by her longtime friend, Joe Pironti, with whom she spent many wonderful years.

A graveside service will be held at the convenience of her family at Pine Grove Cemetery in Newport.

Should friends desire, contributions in her memory may be made to VITAS Community Connection, care of VITA Innovative Hospice Care, 5420 NW 33rd Avenue, Suite 100, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309; or to the American Cancer Society.

obit StoreyRobert Storey

Robert Storey, 77, died peacefully on July 9, 2015, in Glover.

He was born on April 16, 1938, to Carroll P. Storey and Sophie Shover in Brownington.

During his lifetime, he worked as a handyman doing farm work.

He enjoyed going to local meal sites for socializing, and liked to make curtains, placemats, and quilts. His pride and joy was his cat Rosco. He enjoyed old cars, playing cards, especially “500,” and visiting with family and friends over a cup of coffee. He was an easy and enjoyable man.

He is survived by his niece Harriet Hall and her husband, John, and their children, Alfred and Joshua, all of Newport.

He was predeceased by his sister Ruth T. Green, in 1990.

Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. on Wednesday, July 15, at the Curtis-Britch-Converse-Rushford Funeral Home, at 37 Lake Road in Newport, with the Reverend Paul Prince officiating. Friends may call at the funeral home on July 15, from 1 p.m. until the hour of the funeral. Interment will follow in Derby Center Cemetery.

Should friends desire, contributions in his memory may be made to the Norris Cotton Cancer Center North, 1080 Hospital Drive, St. Johnsbury, Vermont 05819.

Online condolences at curtis-britch.com.

obit VallieresAnnette T. Vallieres

Annette T. Vallieres, 90, of Island Pond died peacefully on July 8, 2015, in Newport.

She was born on September 7, 1924, in St. Camille de Wolf, Quebec, to Phébia and Aline (Campagna) Lapointe.

On July 13, 1946, she married Clement Vallieres, who predeceased her on February 16, 2006.

Mrs. Vallieres owned and operated Vallieres Sporting Goods Store in Island Pond for many years. She enjoyed her customers at the store and she also enjoyed knitting and putting puzzles together.

She is survived by her children: Michael Vallieres and his wife, Holly, Liliane Sprague and her husband, Peter, Nicole Tardiff and her husband, Simon, and Alaine Vallieres and his companion, Evelyne Kinney, all of Island Pond. She is also survived by many grandchildren and great-grandchildren; her daughter-in-law Beckie Bremseth and her husband, Joe, of Morgan; and by her sisters: Lucille Lapoint of Cookshire, Quebec, and Madeleine Lussier and her husband, Simon, of Quebec.

She was predeceased by her son Gaetan Vallieres, and by her brother Paul Lapointe.

Services will be held at a later date.

Online condolences at curtisbritch.com.

Service

Marie Judith Foy

Funeral services for Marie Judith Foy, who died on February 26, 2015, will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, July 18, at St. James Catholic Church in Island Pond, where a Mass of Christian burial will be celebrated. Interment will be in Lakeside Cemetery in Island Pond, followed by a luncheon at Sunrise Manor.

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