Poetry book on fall light, picking stone, cutting corn

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kinsey book review webcopyright the Chronicle March 26, 2014

Winter Ready, by Leland Kinsey.  Published by Green Writers Press. 85 pages.  Paperback.  $14.95

Reviewed by Tena Starr

It was yet another cold and snowy March day in this cold and snowy winter of 2014, and Leland Kinsey’s latest book of poetry, Winter Ready, seemed an apt read.  But there is little in this volume that chronicles the grueling.  Nor is Winter Ready poetry as some may know it.

This lovely collection is as much prose as poetry.  It’s a collection of moments, observations, and sometimes a reminiscence of a Northeast Kingdom that’s, sadly in my view, fading into memory.

In fact, the onerous chore of picking stone had completely escaped my own memory until I ran across Mr. Kinsey’s poem called “Stone Picking.”

Does anyone pick stone anymore?  We used to on our farm.  I recall, as a girl, thinking that rocks must somehow grow and multiply, like potatoes.  Picking stone was a task for Sisyphus, who spent eternity rolling a boulder uphill.

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Susan Dunklee makes history again, returns home

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Olympian biathlete Susan Dunklee of Barton smiles in the cafeteria at the Craftsbury Outdoor Center, where she trains as part of the Green Racing Project.  Photo by Natalie Hormilla

Olympian biathlete Susan Dunklee of Barton smiles in the cafeteria at the Craftsbury Outdoor Center, where she trains as part of the Green Racing Project. Photo by Natalie Hormilla

copyright the Chronicle April 2, 2014

by Natalie Hormilla

CRAFTSBURY — Susan Dunklee of Barton returned to Vermont last week, having made history once again.

After her Olympic run in Sochi, Russia, in February, it was back to business as usual on the biathlon World Cup circuit.  In her final week of races, in Oslo, Norway, Ms. Dunklee had a career breakthrough:  She came in third in the 7.5-kilometer sprint, marking the first time in 20 years that an American woman biathlete graced the World Cup podium.

“Just to get up there, when it’s the same field, it’s pretty special,” she said in an interview last week.  She was referring to the wide field of athletes that participate in World Cup races.

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Obituary April 2, 2014

obit wilsonLouise (Patenaude) Wilson

Louise (Patenaude) Wilson, 53, of Chazy, New York, beloved wife of Thomas Wilson, died peacefully on March 24, 2014, at the Fletcher Allen Health Center in Burlington, after a long illness.

She was born on December 18, 1960, in Newport, a daughter of Alphonse and Yvette (Rainville) Patenaude.

She graduated from North Country Union High School in Newport, in the Class of 1979.

On August 29, 1981, she married Thomas Wilson, who survives her.

She enjoyed traveling and camping with her husband in their camper, playing cards, bird watching, and reading.

She is survived by her husband Thomas Wilson of Chazy; her father Alphonse Patenaude of Derby Line; her brothers and sisters:  Jeanne O’Bryan and her husband, Mark, of Fairfax, Donald Patenaude and his wife, Cindy, of Brattleboro, Danny Patenaude and his wife, Rhonda, of Derby, Linda Elliott and her husband, Wayne, of Essex Center, and Monique LaPlante and her husband, Arthur, of Beebe Plain; her beloved cats:  Miss Kitty and Theodore; her nieces and nephews:  Erin, Monika, Whitney, Ryan, Michael, Tyler, Taylor, Erin, Brandon, Emma, Jena, Kati, and Charlee; her godchildren:  Kylie, Erica, Steve, Corry, and Taylor; her father-in-law Trevor Wilson of Ayers Cliff, Quebec; and by numerous aunts, uncles, and cousins.

She was predeceased by her mother Yvette Patenaude on May 30, 2013; and by a brother, Michael Patenaude, in 1961.

Funeral services were held on March 31, in Derby Line.  Spring interment will be held at St. Edward’s Cemetery in Derby Line.

Should friends desire, contributions in her memory may be made to the Muscular Dystrophy Association, 29 Tafts Corners, Williston, Vermont 05495.

Online condolences may be sent to the family through the funeral home website at www.curtis-britch.com.

Service

Elaine Nancy Gleason

A memorial service at graveside will be held for Elaine Nancy Gleason, who died on January 11, 2014, at Maple Hill Cemetery in Barton on Saturday, May 3, at 11 a.m.

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Editorial: It’s the Chronicle’s fortieth birthday — thanks everyone!

A solid reminder of how we used to operate — an old manual typewriter — sits in a corner of the Chronicle office.  The hat belonged to Anna Baker, the artist responsible for the Chronicle cows, and on the wall behind it is a copy of the original flyer announcing the start of a new newspaper, the Chronicle.  Photo by Bethany M. Dunbar

A solid reminder of how we used to operate — an old manual typewriter — sits in a corner of the Chronicle office. The hat belonged to Anna Baker, the artist responsible for the Chronicle cows, and on the wall behind it is a copy of the original flyer announcing the start of a new newspaper, the Chronicle. Photo by Bethany M. Dunbar

copyright the Chronicle March 26, 2014

This week, March 28, is the Chronicle’s fortieth birthday.  Chris and Ellen Braithwaite produced that first edition on typewriters in an Albany farmhouse.  It had stories about Orleans Village winning a lawsuit, cuts to the Lake Region Union High School budget, an obituary, a review of a gardening book written by former West Glover resident Carey Scher — in other words, pretty much the same sort of things we’re still writing about all these years later.

That first paper was by no means fancy.  It was a mere eight pages, put out by relative newcomers to the area on antiquated equipment amidst small children, a mongrel dog, and, according to its first reporter, Colin Nickerson, monstrous spiders that the Braithwaites refused to kill on the grounds that they were natural insecticide.

But some people bought that very first Chronicle — and much to our surprise, some of them have continued to buy it every single week for the past 40 years.

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First annual March Madness Basketball Tournament held at Brownington school

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The Brownington girls team came in first place in the girls division for the Brownington Graded School’s first annual March Madness Basketball Tournament, held from March 14 to 16.  The team, pictured from left to right, starting in the front row, included:  Alaina Zenonos, Olivia Lacoss, Molly Horton, and Tia Martinez.  In the back row, from left, are:  Faith Kempton, Katie Willard, Kennedy Falconer, Bria Lacoss, and Coach Mike Lacoss.  Photos courtesy of Mike and Barb Lacoss

The Brownington girls team came in first place in the girls division for the Brownington Graded School’s first annual March Madness Basketball Tournament, held from March 14 to 16. The team, pictured from left to right, starting in the front row, included: Alaina Zenonos, Olivia Lacoss, Molly Horton, and Tia Martinez. In the back row, from left, are: Faith Kempton, Katie Willard, Kennedy Falconer, Bria Lacoss, and Coach Mike Lacoss. Photos courtesy of Mike and Barb Lacoss

copyright the Chronicle March 26, 2014

The Brownington girls team came in first place in the girls division for the Brownington Graded School’s first annual March Madness Basketball Tournament, held from March 14 to 16.  The Troy girls were runners up.

The Charleston boys, who called themselves the Mustangs, were the champions of the boys division.  The Brighton boys were runners up.

Nine teams from six schools played in the tournament, which was a fund-raiser for the eighth-grade field trip and the new Brownington Athletic Fund.  — submitted by Mike and Barb Lacoss

The Troy girls were runners up.  In the front row, from left to right, are:  Makayla Ban, Alicia Farrell, Brook Gentry, Sammy Barcomb, Katie Lacasse, Ally Santaw, and Mckenna Marsh.  In the back row, from left, are:  Darcy Mayhew, Abby Baraw, Rebecca McDonald, Abbie Desjarlais, Fayth Columbia, Jessica Carr, and Coach Shannon Bowman.

The Troy girls were runners up. In the front row, from left to right, are: Makayla Ban, Alicia Farrell, Brook Gentry, Sammy Barcomb, Katie Lacasse, Ally Santaw, and Mckenna Marsh. In the back row, from left, are: Darcy Mayhew, Abby Baraw, Rebecca McDonald, Abbie Desjarlais, Fayth Columbia, Jessica Carr, and Coach Shannon Bowman.

The Brighton boys were runners up.  In the front row, from left, are:  Jacob Kocis, Troy Sanville, Alex Barnes, and Josh Rivers.  In the back row, from left, are:  Asstistamt Coach Cooper Densmore, Nicholas Bingham, Zach Letourneau, Aaron Verge, Kyle Hackett, and Coach Bill Burns.

The Brighton boys were runners up. In the front row, from left, are: Jacob Kocis, Troy Sanville, Alex Barnes, and Josh Rivers. In the back row, from left, are: Asstistamt Coach Cooper Densmore, Nicholas Bingham, Zach Letourneau, Aaron Verge, Kyle Hackett, and Coach Bill Burns.

The Charleston boys, who called themselves the Mustangs, were the champions of the boys division.  In the front row, from left, are:  Noah Rivard, Alex Fearino, Zachary Vill’neuve, and Michael Martin.  In the back row, from left, are:  Coach Tony Lamoureux, Cody Bingham, Austin Oleskiewicz, Curtis Bowen, Garrette Blake, and Coach Bob Bowen.

The Charleston boys, who called themselves the Mustangs, were the champions of the boys division. In the front row, from left, are: Noah Rivard, Alex Fearino, Zachary Vill’neuve, and Michael Martin. In the back row, from left, are: Coach Tony Lamoureux, Cody Bingham, Austin Oleskiewicz, Curtis Bowen, Garrette Blake, and Coach Bob Bowen.

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In the Legislature: Local control in wind siting unlikely

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David Mealiea and Anna Dirkse, both of Burlington, were two of four singing pickets who stood outside the State House last Thursday in support of raising the minimum wage.  “We fight for human rights so all can be free,” they sang.  Photo by Paul Lefebvre

David Mealiea and Anna Dirkse, both of Burlington, were two of four singing pickets who stood outside the State House last Thursday in support of raising the minimum wage. “We fight for human rights so all can be free,” they sang. Photo by Paul Lefebvre

copyright the Chronicle March 26, 2014

by Paul Lefebvre

MONTPELIER — Regional and local planners are expected to be the big losers in a bill to open up the siting process for ridgeline industrial wind projects.

Scheduled to appear on the Senate floor, the bill was rerouted to the Senate Committee on Appropriations Tuesday as negotiations continued behind the scenes to strike a compromise and keep it alive.

“Unfortunately, regional planning is one of those things we’re probably not going to wind up with,” said Senator John Rodgers of Glover during a telephone interview Tuesday.

One of the stated purposes of the bill was “to strengthen the role of planning commissions and local selectboard and planning commissions in the siting review process for energy facilities by giving greater weight to their recommendations and plans.”

But at the end of the day, that’s not likely what’s going to happen.

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Profile: Bennett retires after 30 years of service to town

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Jeannine Bennett.  Photo courtesy of Mrs. Bennett

Jeannine Bennett. Photo courtesy of Mrs. Bennett

copyright the Chronicle March 19, 2014

by Bethany M. Dunbar

CHARLESTON — Town Clerk Jeannine Bennett retired at Town Meeting this year, after 30 years of service to the town.

Actually, she did not attend Town Meeting because she wanted to avoid a big fuss.

“They did the whole cake thing two years ago,” she said.  Instead, she took a trip to Maryland to visit her daughter and son-in-law, Julie and Heath Wilson, and her 12-year-old grandson Jeff.

When Mrs. Bennett started working for the town, a lot of the town records were hand written.

“I knew shorthand.  That’s one of the reasons I got hired,” she said.  She also had excellent penmanship.

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Community Justice Part II: Senate bill pushes new ways to deal with crime

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The theory of restorative justice is neatly summed up in this chart created by John Perry, whose work helped in the creation of Vermont’s system.  “I’ve used this chart in presentations around the country,” Mr. Perry said when asked for permission to use the diagram.  “It might as well be published in Vermont.”

The theory of restorative justice is neatly summed up in this chart created by John Perry, whose work helped in the creation of Vermont’s system. “I’ve used this chart in presentations around the country,” Mr. Perry said when asked for permission to use the diagram. “It might as well be published in Vermont.”

copyright the Chronicle March 19, 2014

by Joseph Gresser

If a bill passed last week by the Vermont Senate becomes law, it will be the latest step in Vermont’s very long struggle to find new, and better, ways to deal with criminals.  That struggle began about 20 years ago, with a group of young idealists, led by a visionary Westmore man, reshaping how justice is meted out.

The recently approved Senate bill would allow some offenders — primarily those who pose no threat to public safety — the option of participating in a nontraditional program, such as the community justice program that operates in Newport.

Its intent is “that law enforcement officials and criminal justice professionals develop and maintain programs at every stage of the criminal justice system to provide alternatives to a traditional punitive criminal justice response….”

In the nontraditional reparative justice program, community volunteers work with an offender to develop a plan for making amends to the victims of his crime and to repair the damage done by his actions.

That program was developed about two decades ago by a group of young workers at the state Department of Corrections (DOC), with support from several governors and an important contribution from a longtime resident of Westmore, Bill Page.

In the 1970s the nation was seized by a fear of violent crime, and a concern that prisons were not fulfilling the intended purpose of rehabilitation.  John Martinson, a noted researcher on the subject, grew pessimistic about the results of all the programs he investigated.

He wrote an article for the magazine Public Interest setting out his findings, an article whose conclusion, usually summarized under the heading “Nothing works,” was spread throughout the popular media.

Around the country, prisons were generally seen only as a means to keep offenders from harming law-abiding citizens.  Legislators followed the public mood and voted for increasingly harsh sentences for all manner of offenses.

A group of new officials at the Vermont DOC, however, thought they could find a solution to what seemed an intractable problem.

“We were arrogant, brash and young enough not to know better,” recalled John Perry in a recent telephone interview.  Mr. Perry retired from the DOC as director of planning in 2011.  “We thought we could make a difference,” he said.

They began in ignorance.

“We knew crime was increasing — increasing like crazy in the late ’70s and ’80s,” Mr. Perry said.

What the young officials at the DOC did not know was that the increase was in reported crime, not actual crime.

In the late ’60s and early ’70s, Vermont experienced an influx of new residents coming from other parts of the country.  One of the things they brought with them was an expectation of what government was supposed to do, Mr. Perry said.  As a result, the new residents tended to call police for assistance more often than the locals had.

As in other states, Vermont legislators reacted to what they perceived as an increase in crime by increasing penalties in an attempt to stem it.

The result, recalled former DOC Commissioner John Gorczyk in a telephone interview, was “an explosion in incarceration without an increase in crime.”

The DOC, in those days, was “underfunded, overcrowded and under-loved,” Mr. Perry said.

But young, idealistic officials were put in a position to make changes to the system when Governor Richard Snelling brought William Ciuros to Vermont to take over the DOC.  Mr. Ciuros forced the department’s old guard out and installed “the new kids” in their place, Mr. Perry said.

Those included Joseph Patrissi, then deputy commissioner, Mr. Gorczyk, and Mr. Perry.  Mr. Patrissi is currently executive director of Northeast Kingdom Community Action (NEKCA).

Mr. Ciuros got his deputies to cut their long hair and change their attire from woolen shirts to suits.

“We worked 12 hour days,” Mr. Perry recalled.  “I never worked so hard in my life.”

Mr. Ciuros soon ran afoul of Governor Snelling and was dismissed, to be replaced by Con Hogan, but his team remained in place.

Among other initiatives, they started letting nonviolent offenders serve their sentences in the community, or on weekends, so they could continue working, Mr. Patrissi said.

That program hit a hard bump when the son of vice-presidential candidate Geraldine Farraro was arrested at Middlebury College with two and a half pounds of cocaine, said Mr. Perry.

He met the qualifications for release, except for having a residence in Vermont, Mr. Perry recalled.  That was quickly managed, but the national media soon descended on Vermont to photograph the sign saying “luxury condominiums” outside his apartment complex, Mr. Perry said.

Madeleine Kunin had just been elected governor, and she tried to provide political cover for the DOC by creating the Community Corrections Advisory Board, Mr. Patrissi said.

She appointed Mr. Page to the board, as well as John Downs, a founding partner at Downs, Rachlin and Martin, and Fay Honey Knopp, a director of the Safer Society Foundation.  The Safer Society program is a national referral service for sex offenders seeking therapy.  She was also the founder of the Prison Research Education Action Program.  Also on the committee was Jack Coleman, a former president of Haverford College who spent a sabbatical from his job as an inmate at a Pennsylvania prison.  Mr. Coleman was a friend of the warden, who was the only one who knew he was there voluntarily, Mr. Perry said.

Mr. Patrissi and Mr. Page had already met, at a book club meeting at Mr. Page’s house on Willoughby Lake where both men spent summers.

After the meeting, Mr. Page, who knew Mr. Patrissi was commissioner of corrections, approached him.

“He asked, ‘How would you like to know something about human nature?’” Mr. Patrissi recalled.  “I’d been in corrections 20 years and I was schooled in that side of human nature,” he said.

Mr. Page had been director of corporate planning at the Polaroid Corporation during that firm’s glory years and had learned from the work of E.O. Wilson, a sociobiologist and the world’s foremost expert on ants.  Professor Wilson’s work, which traced the genetic basis of human nature, was being used by Polaroid in its marketing efforts, Mr. Patrissi said.

If Mr. Page decided someone was worthy of his attention, he’d latch on to that person as a teacher, said Mr. Gorczyk.  Both Mr. Perry and Mr. Patrissi called him a mentor.

Mr. Page began running a kind of school for DOC officials, inviting them to his house, or taking them down to the Cambridge, Massachusetts, headquarters of Polaroid for classes with him or other experts.

As Mr. Perry recalled, he outlined some of the basic principles of human nature, including an innate fear of strangers, a preference for working in groups of around six members and, most importantly, the principle of reciprocity.

“If I buy you a drink at a bar,” Mr. Perry said to explain reciprocity, “you had better buy the next round.  If I have to buy the second round, there won’t be a third one, and we won’t be friends.”

Working with Mr. Page and Mr. Downs, the group began to feel its way toward the system of reparative justice.

All felt that a real system of justice had to begin by putting the victim at its center, something that the English system of law, which was largely adopted by most U.S. states, did not do.

A reading of history, Mr. Perry said, shows the English originally had a system of law that rated the worth of an individual by his or her rank and punished offenses with fines that were proportional to the crime.

The basic idea, Mr. Perry said, was that a village needed all of its citizens if it was to function, so disputes had to be resolved in a way that would not cause the loss of someone’s skills to the community.

When William the Conqueror took over England in 1066, he assigned his son the task of creating a system of colonial law, Mr. Perry said.  That law treated every crime as an offense against the king, who was presumed to own everything in the country.  Fines were no longer paid to a victim, but were given to the king, and many crimes were punished by death or mutilation.

Vermont, in its Constitution, bans the latter form of punishment, which it calls “sanguinary punishment,” Mr. Perry said, so a system that turned away from the English model could be seen as being in accord with the intent of the state’s founders.

Mr. Perry found similar ways of meting out justice in such native societies as the Navaho, who resolve criminal offenses with a series of meetings or circles which seek to define the nature of the crime and gradually, through discussion, to find a way to mend the damage.

Whenever they hit a problem, Mr. Page would create a report that analyzed the situation in detail and proposed a solution, Mr. Perry said.

“He was right every damned time,” he recalled.

Mr. Patrissi said Mr. Page showed great patience with the group.

“Here we were, with this genius, who already knew where this was going to go,” he said.  “We were in the hands of a genius.”

When Governor Snelling returned to office after Governor Kunin finished her last term, he called Mr. Patrissi in and demanded 12 great ideas, Mr. Patrissi said.

He liked the proposal for a reparative justice program and, after his sudden death, so did his replacement, Governor Howard Dean.

In order to figure out how to sell the program to Vermonters, the DOC wrote a grant and hired a polling firm to conduct the sort of market research that might be undertaken before a company like Proctor and Gamble launches a product, said Mr. Perry.

After conducting focus groups and an extensive telephone poll, the results were in.  The people of Vermont hated the DOC, they also disliked the state’s attorneys, criminal defense lawyers and judges.  They did like juries, though, Mr. Perry said.

“They trusted themselves,” he concluded.

Vermonters were also very positive about the reparative justice system when it was explained to them.  The polls showed 92 to 94 percent favorability ratings, Mr. Perry said.

“Nothing gets 94 percent favorability ratings,” he said.

The first attempts at operating a reparative justice system were run through the DOC, but it soon became clear that the program would work better if it were handled by community members through an organization outside state government.

That led to the creation of community justice centers.

Over the years, the results of the reparative board have proved the worth of the idea.  A 2007 study was hard to publish, said Mr. Perry, because journals found it hard to believe that recidivism could be reduced in Vermont by 26 percent through the process.

Since the creation of restorative justice programs, Vermont has been frequently visited by representatives from other states and other countries seeking to learn from the state’s experience.

Because Vermont has a unified corrections system, unlike other states with county, city and other government subdivisions running jails, its database is the most comprehensive in the country — a boon for researchers, Mr. Perry said.

Still, he and Mr. Gorczyk said they are not satisfied with the system as it exists.  They feel it is underused.

Mr. Perry said he is pleased to see many schools are beginning to use the principles of restorative justice is dealing with infractions such as bullying.  The results, he said, are very promising.

State law prohibits the use of reparative boards for some crimes, such as domestic abuse.  Mr. Perry said he regrets that and believes the practice can achieve excellent results in those cases, if used properly.

Mr. Gorczyk said he has been pessimistic about the future of reparative justice until recently, but said the new Senate-passed bill is giving him renewed hope.

For Mr. Perry, it’s important to take the long view.

“We’re only 20 years into what will be a 100-year process,” he said.

This is the second of a three-part series on community justice.  The first part was in the February 19 issue of the Chronicle, and can be read here.

contact Joseph Gresser at joseph@bartonchronicle.com

For more free articles from the Chronicle like this one, see our Editor’s Picks pages.  For all the Chronicle’s stories, pick up a print copy or subscribe, either for print or digital editions.

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At NCUHS: Spidey swings from NYC to Newport

G.G. Rafuse produced this striking image as the log for The Spidey Project’s original off-Broadway production.

G.G. Rafuse produced this striking image as the log for The Spidey Project’s original off-Broadway production.

copyright the Chronicle March 12, 2014

by Joseph Gresser

NEWPORT — A musical with music written by one North Country Union High School (NCUHS) alumnus and directed by another, will swing into town on Friday, May 16, for a single performance.  The staging of The Spidey Project will benefit the school’s Art and Communications Academy and help fund its fall musical production.

Chase Gosselin, who graduated from the high school in 2012 and is now engaged in a variety of theatrical enterprises in New York City, is slated to direct the show, which has a script written by Justin Moran and Jonathan Roufaeal, and music composed by Newport native Adam Podd and Doug Katsaros.

The show was created when Mr. Moran posted a video announcing the production as a response to the long-delayed and phenomenally costly Broadway production of Spiderman:  Turn Off The Dark.

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Obituaries March 19, 2014

obit BlaisRachel F. Blais

Rachel F. Blais, 81, of Derby Line died on March 12, 2014, in Derby.

She was born on October 1, 1932, in Frampton, Quebec, to Thomas and Rosanna (Audet) Ferland.

On September 7, 1957, she married Gilles Blais, who survives her.

She was a member of the Holy Name Society of St. Edward’s Catholic Church in Derby Line.

She traveled with her husband throughout the United States and she enjoyed family gatherings and playing cards.

She is survived by her husband Gilles Blais of Derby Line; her children:  Donald Blais and his companion, Francine Brandolino, of New York, Bernard Blais and his wife, Bernadette, of Randolph, New Jersey, Paul Blais and his wife, Diane, of South Burlington, David Blais and his wife, Dale, of Danville, New Hampshire, and Patrick Blais and his wife, Cynthia, of Hudson, Massachusetts; her grandchildren:  Brian, Brittany, Daniel, Benjamin, Molly, Samantha, Mark and Isabella; her siblings:  Gerard, Raymond, and Real Ferland all of Quebec, Rose Gagnon, Rita Bulduc and Rolande Tremblay and her husband, Roger, all of Quebec, and Regina Provost and her husband, Richard, of Derby; and by many nieces and nephews.  She is also survived by her brothers and sisters-in-law:  Gerry Blais, Doris Porier, Pauline Sanville, and Sylvia and Philip Lauzon.

She was predeceased by her brothers:  Rosaire and Robert Ferland.

Funeral services were held on March 17, in Derby Line.  Spring interment will be in St. Edward’s Cemetery in Derby Line.

Should friends desire, contributions in her memory may be made to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Vermont Chapter, 75 Talcott Road, Williston, Vermont 05495.

Online condolences may be sent to the family through the funeral home website at www.curtis-britch.com.

obit ChaffeeDale Erton Chaffee

Dale Erton Chaffee, 95, of Albany died on March 13, 2014, in White River Junction.

He was born on January 11, 1919, in Greensboro, to Reuben and Josephine (Huntoon) Chaffee.

On November 26, 1945, he married Ida Honsinger, who survives him.

Mr. Chaffee grew up on a farm and after he married he worked as a carpenter.

He entered the United States Army where he served his country during World War II.

He retired from Ethan Allen Manufacturing in Orleans, where he was a furniture inspector.

He held memberships and was a life member with the American Legion Post #23 of Orleans, and the Brown-Johnson VFW in Montpelier.  He was also past commander of the American Legion Post #23.  He was a member of the Albany Methodist Church where he was the church trustee emeritus.

His hobbies included reading, maple sugaring, fishing, gardening and spending time with his family.

He is survived by his wife Ida Chaffee of Albany; his children:  Ida Burdick and Mark Chaffee, both of Albany; his grandchildren:  Willard “Andy” Burdick of Woodsville, New Hampshire, and Jonathan Dale Burdick and his wife, Joanna, of Claremont, New Hampshire; his great-grandchildren:  Alyssa, Matthew, Austin, Peyton, Davan, Jacob, and Logan; his sister-in-law Beverly Chaffee of Montpelier; and by several nieces and nephews.

He was predeceased by his siblings:  Lee, Arland, Carroll, Captola, and Reuben Chaffee, and Myrtle Dunbar and Velma Hale.

Friends may call at the Curtis-Britch & Davis Funeral Home in Craftsbury Common on Sunday, March 23, from 2 to 4 p.m.  A graveside service will be held in the spring in Albany Village Cemetery.

Should friends desire, contributions in his memory may be made to the Vermont Legionaries Temporary Assistance Fund, care of Milt Willis Jr. (American Legion), 215 N. Main Street, White River Junction, Vermont 05009.

Online condolences may be sent to the family through the funeral home website at www.curtis-britch.com.

obit cornellCheryl Cornell

Cheryl Cornell died in Newport, on March 9, 2014.

She was born on February 21, 1946, daughter of Charles A. and Myrtle Bacon of Derby Line, who are now deceased.

She graduated from Derby Academy in the Class of 1964, and attended Burdett College and the Community College of Vermont.

She worked in several states including Massachusetts, Delaware, California, and Arizona, but always returned to Vermont where for the last 30 years she has worked mainly as a bookkeeper.  Her most recent position was office assistant at Northeast Kingdom Homecare in Newport.

She enjoyed reading, gardening and local area history.  And when she wasn’t voicing her opinion in her famous letters to the editor, in the summers she could be found every weekend checking out yard sales in her little red sports car.

Survivors include her daughter Terri Anne Cortes and her boyfriend, Casey Wheeler, of Derby; her grandson Nicholas Brock; her sister Terry Sudol of Montpelier and her children and grandchildren; her brother Dale “Bart” Bacon of Jeffersonville and his children and grandchildren; as well as several cousins and special friends.  She is also survived by her two cats:  Emma and Bella.

According to her wishes, there will be no funeral service and burial will be private.  A celebration of her life will be announced at a later date.

Should friends desire, contributions in her memory may be made to the Pope Memorial Frontier Animal Shelter, 502 Strawberry Acres, Newport, Vermont 05855.

Online condolences may be sent to the family through the funeral home website at www.curtis-britch.com.

obit DawberWinston Franklin Josef Dawber

Winston Franklin Josef Dawber, 71, of Barton died suddenly on March 12, 2014, at his home in Barton.

He was born on August 26, 1942, in Lyskeard, Cornwall, England, to Alexander and Constance (Davis) Dawber.  His adoptive parents were Philip and Gladys (Davis) Dawber.

Mr. Dawber grew up in Charlton, Massachusetts, and graduated from Charlton High School in 1961.

He worked at Charlton Woolen Mill until his family moved to New Hampshire and eventually Barton, where he started his own business, W.F. Dawber Insulation.  He also owned the Barton Mini-Mart and Barton Redemption.  After selling the mini-mart, he worked at Columbia Forest Products for several years, and then became a contractor for Memphremagog Rentals, where he was still enjoying working part time.

The world has lost a very special man, and heaven has gained one.  Dad was a man of integrity, honor, great kindness and generosity, and a quiet faith.  He was the man you could count on.  The man who kept his word.  The man who was ready to help family, friends, and strangers.  The man who did the right thing because it was the right thing to do.

He loved trains.  He loved woodworking, creating special projects for his grandchildren and great-granddaughter.  He enjoyed working in his vegetable and flower garden.  He enjoyed watching the birds and wildlife around his home and taking care of the family alpacas.  He loved sugaring with Stacy and Wade.  He looked forward to taking road trips with Heather and Winston.  He didn’t miss his Sunday afternoons watching NASCAR and eating snacks with Sherry and Brian.  He was learning how to be a beekeeper from his nephew Jimmy.  He enjoyed his trips to visit his sister-in-law Jeanne.  However, he found the most joy, and was happiest in the time he spent, with his grandchildren, whether it was helping them with home projects, taking them camping, on vacations, or just visiting.  He was so full of love and pride for each of them.  He absolutely loved and adored his great-granddaughter Kennedy.

Dad was a family man in the truest sense.  He was happiest when he was with his children and grandchildren.  He was there for any event, big or small — “I wouldn’t miss it” is what he would say and he didn’t.

Dad is our hero.  Gramps is our hero.  Our greatest blessing is that God gave him to us to be our dad and grandfather.  Our greatest gift from him is the legacy of how he lived his life, that we would all do the same.  In our sorrow, we find the joy of being so loved by him.

He is survived by his three children:  Sherry and Brian Montminy of Glover, Stacy and Wade Wright of Barton, and Heather and Winston Dowland of Holland; his grandchildren:  Ashley Montminy and Justin St. Pierre of Essex Junction, Brian and Christie Montminy of Barton, Addie and Tanner Atwood of Albany, and Wade Jr. and Amber Wright of Barton; his great-granddaughter Kennedy Rose Atwood; the mother of his children Katie Labor; his special sister-in-law Jeanne Dawber; and by several nieces and nephews.

A graveside service will be held in the spring at the South Barton Cemetery on Nault Road.

Should friends desire, contributions in his memory may be made to the Shriner’s Hospital, 51 Blossom Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114; or to the Disabled American Veterans, care of Winston Dowland, 1461 Whittier Road, Derby Line, Vermont 05830.

Online condolences may be sent to the family through the funeral home website at www.curtis-britch.com.

obit rinesStephen Wesley Rines

Stephen Wesley Rines, 58, of Derby died on March 13, 2014, in Newport.

He was born on August 6, 1955, in Waterville, Maine, to the Reverend Paul Wesley Rines and Maxine Russell Rines.

Mr. Rines was a gifted musician, and served as music director, and as an elder at the Lowell Congregational Church.  He began piano lessons at an early age from his mother at their home and brought his gift and love of music to his home, his friends and his community.

He worked for the U.S. Postal Service for 29 years.  He served as postmaster in Irasburg, Morgan and the last several years in Barton.

He was an avid sports enthusiast, and played soccer, baseball, basketball and volleyball and enjoyed walking in quiet and beautiful places.

He graduated from Waconah High School in 1973, then attended Eastern Nazarene College in Quincy, Massachusetts, where he graduated in 1977, with a BA in religion.  He was an ordained minister and preached at the Newport Nazarene Church for several years.

He leaves behind his wife, Patricia; and his children:  Amy Jacobs and her husband, Bart, of Derby Line, Tara Chaffee and her husband, James, of Dover, New Hampshire, Jennifer Oney and her husband, Justin, of Centennial, Colorado, Stephen Paul Rines of Wesley Chapel, Florida, and Adrienne Haglin and her husband, Andrew, of Salem, New Hampshire; his mother Maxine Russell Rines; his brother Doug and his wife, Faith Rines, of Hartford, Maine; a sister, Sharon Baker, and her husband, Jim, of Largo, Florida; his six much-beloved grandchildren:  Nathan, Abby Rae, Noah, Molly, Sweet Baby James and Kai; as well by numerous aunts, uncles, cousins, nieces, and one nephew.

A celebration of his life will be held at the Church of God, at 295 Crawford Road in Newport, at 1 p.m., on Saturday, March 29.

Should friends desire, contributions may be made to Special Olympics, attention:  Wendy Kelley, 16 Gregory Drive, Suite 2, South Burlington, Vermont 05403.  If checks are sent, be sure to put “Orleans/Essex Program” to be routed to the local chapter.

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