Independence Day celebrations

Fireworks from the Independence Day celebrations in Barton in 2011.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Fireworks from the Independence Day celebrations in Barton in 2011. Photo by Joseph Gresser

Barton

The parade begins at 2 p.m. on Main Street on Saturday, July 4, with a theme of “Seventieth anniversary end to World War II.” The parade route ends at the fairgrounds, where awards will be given in front of the grandstands around 3 p.m.

Fireworks will be at the fairgrounds at dusk, with no cost to enter after 4 p.m.

Roaring Brook Park

Activities will be held on Saturday, July 4, all day at Roaring Brook Park, home of the Orleans County Fairgrounds. Gates open at 9 a.m., admission is $7; kids under ten are free. Parking is free. The day’s events include an antique and farm stock tractor pull beginning at 9 a.m., a gymkhana horse show at noon, a horse and pony pull at 10 a.m., a horseshoe tournament at 10 a.m., a professional lumberjack roundup at 10 a.m., and the Walbridge family lawn mower and ATV pull at 10 a.m.

There will also be a $2 bounce house for kids, slides from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., face-painting, ice cream, a chicken barbecue, food booths, and more.

Fireworks by the Barton Fire Department will be at dusk. Free admission to the fairgrounds after 4 p.m.

Newport

The Harry Corrow Freedom Run begins at 8:30 a.m. on Saturday, July 4, on the bike path in the pines of Prouty Beach. Walkers are welcome. Course choices are a ten-mile, 10K, 5K, or one-mile fun run. Ten percent of all registration fees will go to the Gardner Park Restoration Project and the Memphremagog Ski Touring Foundation. The fee for adults doing a course of ten miles or more is $50; fewer than ten miles is $35. Youth are 50 percent off. Register at dandelionrun.org/2015-harry-corrow-php. Light lunch to follow.

Events at Gardner Memorial Park begin at 3 p.m. with music by the Session Guys. The annual bed races begin at 5 p.m. Anyone interested in registering should contact Andy Cappello of Newport Parks and Recreation at 334-6345.

The Hitmen will play at 7 p.m. The international hula hoop competition begins at 8 p.m. People should bring their own hula hoops. The band Soul Kingdom will play at 8:30 p.m.

Fireworks will fly at 9:45 p.m.

There will be all kinds of food vendors at the park throughout the day, and kayaks will be available to rent at the park from 3 p.m. until dusk.

Greensboro

Fireworks will be at dusk on Friday, July 3, let off on Lake Shore Road, near the ballfield.

The parade is on Saturday, July 4. The lineup starts at around 9:15 a.m., with lineup both at the new fire station and on Lake Shore Road. Anyone is welcome to participate and should just show up. The parade starts promptly at 10 a.m., and ends at the town green where there will be a band, children’s activities, and games.

Also at the town green on July 4, under the tent, there will be a square dance, sponsored by the Greensboro Arts Alliance and Residency, from 7 to 9 p.m. The caller will be Robin Russell, with music by Pete’s Posse. Admission is $5; children under 12 are free. There will also be ice cream, hot dogs, and more.

The Greensboro United Church of Christ will hold its annual chicken barbecue on Saturday, July 4, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Reservations can be made ahead of time. The price remains the same at $10 for a generous plate of barbecue chicken, vinaigrette coleslaw, a roll, beverage, and dessert. Proceeds from this event benefit the work of the church. The barbecue starts immediately after the parade behind the church. Reservations are accepted by e-mail at greensborochurch@gmail.com. Reservations are not considered confirmed unless an e-mail confirmation is sent. Reservations may also be made by calling 533-2223. There are a limited number of meals, so reservations are recommended.

Also, the Greensboro Free Library will hold its annual book sale on July 4, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Westmore

The annual pancake breakfast at the Westmore Fellowship Hall is from 8:30 to 11 a.m. on Saturday, July 4. The menu includes homemade pancakes, Vermont fancy maple syrup, scrambled eggs, ham, and coffee and juice. Donations of $8 for adults, and less for children, according to age, go to the Westmore Community Church Youth Camp Scholarship Fund.

The sixteenth annual Willoughby Boat Parade will be on Saturday, July 4, with “Cartoons on Parade” as the theme. Participants should decorate their boat, canoe, or kayak depicting their favorite Vermont moment. The first-place winners will receive a trophy and $50. The second- and third-place winners get trophies. To be eligible for a prize, boats must be at the starting point by 3:30 p.m. to register and receive a number used by the judges for identification. To pre-register, or for more information, call 673-2043, or e-mail doreenallen64@yahoo.com. Boats entered in the parade will meet off Crescent Beach, on the west side of the lake, at 3:30 p.m. The parade will proceed north along the west shore, cross the north beach, and travel south along the east shore, ending at Trails End, where the winners will be announced. There is no rain date.

The annual Willoughby Lake 5K run and walk will be held on Sunday, July 5, to benefit the Westmore Ladies Aid Scholarship Fund. Doors to the Westmore Community Hall will open at 9 a.m., with the race beginning at 11 a.m. For questions, or to pre-register, call Gail Robitaille at 525-3689.

Derby

The parade will be on Saturday, July 4, starting at 10 a.m. at the Elks Club. It will go down Main Street, past North Country Union Junior High School (NCUJHS) and people can stop at the Nelsons’ barnyard or circle back around to the Elks. There will be a flea market and barbecue in front of NCUJHS. The Boy Scouts will sell food, including hot dogs and hamburgers. There will also be a bounce house. The food will be served starting around 11:30 a.m., and events will continue until around 3 or 4 p.m.

To enter a float in the parade, contact Kurt Brainard at 766-5588.

Island Pond

The weekend’s events kick off on Friday, July 3, with Classic Rewind playing at Pavilion Park, part of Friday Night Live, which runs from 6 to 10 p.m. There will also be a barbecue, local vendors, and a fireworks extravaganza at dusk. The rain date for fireworks is Saturday, July 11.

The parade will be on Saturday, July 4, at 11 a.m. To enter a float in the parade, call Melinda Lamoureux at 723-6130. There will be pony rides behind the Municipal Building from 12 to 3 p.m., and a duck race at 1 p.m., with prizes of $500, $100, and $75. Participants can buy ducks at the Island Pond Welcome Center, Gervais Ace Hardware, Passumpsic Savings Bank, and other participating merchants. For more information, call Jeanne at 723-6138. There is also a townwide scavenger hunt on Saturday, from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m., that starts and ends at the Welcome Center. For more information, call Mike or Tim at 723-0470. At 2 p.m., there will be a boat parade. For more information, call Nate at 723-4218. On Saturday night, the Adams Band will play at Pavilion Park from 6 to 10 p.m.

The cardboard boat race will be on Sunday, July 5, at noon. Allowed materials include cardboard, duct or masking tape, liquid nails, adhesive, latex, paint, and varnish. No flex seal or plastic sheeting. For more information, call Jeanne at 723-6138.

North Troy

The parade will be on Saturday, July 4, starting from the old mill at 11 a.m. The parade will march right up Main Street, down to the American Legion Post #28 home. The legion hopes that children will get involved and decorate their bikes. Old cars and floats are also welcome. Set up for the parade will be around 10 or 10:30 a.m. There will be a chicken barbecue at noon at the legion, with a donation required.

Craftsbury

The Craftsbury Village block party will be from 5 p.m. to dark on Friday, July 3, featuring free barbecue and games for the whole family, and live music from the Eames Brothers, the Craftsbury Chamber Players, and DJ Vu. Fireworks by Andrew Johnson will go off at dusk. The street will be closed between Cemetery and the Creek roads.

For more things to do, see Things to Do in the Northeast Kingdom.

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Plans for local dispatch center slow down

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Assistant Judge Ben Batchelder speaks to a meeting of selectmen and first responders Monday evening at the Orleans County Courthouse.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Assistant Judge Ben Batchelder speaks to a meeting of selectmen and first responders Monday evening at the Orleans County Courthouse. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle July 1, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

NEWPORT — Select boards and side judges encouraged the Orleans County Sheriff’s Department to keep planning for a local dispatch center, but suggested that a timetable calling for opening by the end of the year was too ambitious.

At a meeting held at the county courthouse Monday evening, Assistant Judge Ben Batchelder explained the county’s budget process and said that, even moving as quickly as possible, money to establish and run the proposed dispatch center would not be available until October 2016.

The county holds a public hearing every December to discuss budget needs, which include…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Relay for Life: Over 400 join the fight against cancer

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The American Cancer Society’s Northeast Kingdom edition of Relay for Life took place in Newport on Saturday night.  Luminarias commemorating cancer victims and survivors were placed along the track at North Country Union High School and lit at nightfall.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

The American Cancer Society’s Northeast Kingdom edition of Relay for Life took place in Newport on Saturday night. Luminarias commemorating cancer victims and survivors were placed along the track at North Country Union High School and lit at nightfall. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle July 1, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

NEWPORT — The luminaria-lined track at North Country Union High School (NCUHS) was filled with people of all ages talking and laughing Saturday night as they walked to raise money to fight cancer.

Ice-filled kiddie pools at either end of the track kept water bottles cold so participants could rehydrate during their trek.

By Saturday morning 323 people had signed up for the American Cancer Society’s 12-hour Relay for Life in advance. In the evening, 89 more signed up in person, and others came to walk without signing in, or simply to buy a luminaria bag. The relay lasts all night.

People who are signed up are grouped into teams. Thirty-five teams raised…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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World War II vet receives a letter from the Queen

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Donald Wheatley, formerly of Glover, received best wishes from Queen Elizabeth II for his service in World War II.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Donald Wheatley, formerly of Glover, received best wishes from Queen Elizabeth II for his service in World War II. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle July 1, 2015

by Tena Starr

NEWPORT — World War II veteran Donald Wheatley, formerly of Glover, received an unusual honor last week. Queen Elizabeth II of England sent him her best wishes and a photograph of herself.

A letter from the Queen’s lady-in-waiting was presented to Mr. Wheatley at Bel-Aire Quality Care Nursing Center in Newport on Wednesday, June 24.

“Donald has a rather illustrious and interesting past that caught Her Majesty’s attention,” said Sharon Campbell of Island Pond.

Ms. Campbell is originally from England…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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In Barton: A mixed reaction to townwide yard sale

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Antiques and More was one of the many antique shops in Barton that did well at Barton’s townwide yard sale this year.  To other businesses, it was just another Saturday.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Antiques and More was one of the many antique shops in Barton that did well at Barton’s townwide yard sale this year. To other businesses, it was just another Saturday. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle July 1, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

BARTON — The townwide yard sale, started 20 years old with the hope of bringing people to Barton, certainly does that. Whether it also brings economic activity to local businesses likely depends on what they sell.

Saturday’s annual yard sale was a real boon for the antique shops in town, but other businesses didn’t report much, if any, economic benefit at all.

In a single sale, Village Treasures owner Leo McElroy made half of what he expected to make for the whole day.

But at the Circle K, James Marcy said the mini-mart actually lost money because it staffed extra for customers who didn’t arrive.

And at The Parson’s Corner restaurant, owner Dave Rath said…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Antiques and Uniques July 11

 

In Craftsbury, Saturday, this customer is seen through a stained-glass window, handcrafted by Joe Arborio, during the Antiques & Uniques Festival in 2014.  Photo by David Dudley

In Craftsbury, Saturday, this customer is seen through a stained-glass window, handcrafted by Joe Arborio, during the Antiques & Uniques Festival in 2014. Photo by David Dudley

The forty-fifth annual Antiques and Uniques Festival on Craftsbury Common will be held on Saturday, July 11, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The event is free of charge and open to all. The $5 parking donation goes to the Craftsbury Fire Department. This tented event is rain or shine with seating for seniors and games for children.

Festival goers of all ages come to enjoy shopping for antiques and Vermont crafts, sampling local and artisan food and drink, and picnicing outside of the barbecue tent — all of this to a live folk and fiddle musical backdrop.

With over 100 antiques dealers, Vermont craft vendors, and local specialty foods vendors, the crowd of shoppers easily draws thousands. And the demand for the local foods barbecue is something to be impressed by. With 95 percent of its food coming from within a 15-mile radius of Craftsbury, the barbecue tent is a splendiferous feast. Local grass-fed beef from Sawmill Brook Farm, organic sausages from LeBlanc Family Farm, Vermont Smoke and Cure hot dogs, Pete’s Greens’ organic greens, fresh eggs from Still Meadow Farm, and healthy vegan hummus wraps made by the Craftsbury General Store are just some of the foods available. The Cellars at Jasper Hill has been generous with the festival both in donated money and with donated product. The festival gladly tops their burgers and vegetable wraps with their world award-winning cheese.

The Antiques and Uniques Festival has been held the second Saturday in July every year since 1971 on Craftsbury Common.

The town of Craftsbury decided that it’s going to take a village to continue the festival tradition and therefore the entire village should benefit from it. Here’s how it works: Individuals who wish to volunteer for Antiques and Uniques keep track of the work hours they accumulate and choose a Craftsbury nonprofit or organization that they wish to represent. At the end of the event, all proceeds are distributed to the various organizations. This means that the entire town benefits from the festival because of the generosity of the volunteering patrons.

In a society where it’s so easy to throw things away and replace with the newer, faster and better, concepts like appreciating the “old” or “outdated” can seem ridiculous — but not when one slows down enough to explore the rare beauty and individuality of true craftsmanship. When one walks the green of Craftsbury Common and examines the vendors’ antiques and the crafters’ one-of-a-kind pieces, a feeling of awe arises.

For more information, visit townofcraftsbury.com or e-mail AntiquesAndUniquesVT@gmail.com or call (802) 777-8527. — submitted by Anne-Marie Keppel.

For more things to do, see Things to Do in the Northeast Kingdom.

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Obituaries July 1, 2015

obit AtwoodJeanette I. (Brown) Atwood

Jeanette I. (Brown) Atwood, 78, of Craftsbury, died suddenly on June 16, 2015, at Copley Hospital in Morrisville.

She was born in Williamsville on November 12, 1936, daughter of Merle and Gloria (Cole) Brown and graduated from Bellows Falls High School.

On April 2, 1955, she married Eugene (Jack) R. Atwood and they celebrated 60 years of marriage. Ms. Atwood helped out her husband on the family dairy farm in Chester and Craftsbury for many years. She was a dedicated wife, mother, and grandmother.

She was a member of the Horse and Buggy Club and a leader for the Cub and Girl Scouts.

Her favorite things were going out to eat with family and friends, dancing on Saturday night, playing cards, watching a Red Sox game, and gabbing on the phone.

She is survived by her husband, Jack; a daughter, Vicki, and her husband, Douglas; two sons: Eugene and his wife, Cheryl, and Jeff and his wife, Diane; her grandchildren include Shaun, Amanda, Matthew, Tanner, Cody, Ethan, Kylie, and Justin; and her great-grandchildren include Kennedy Rose, Hayleigh and Brooklyn. She is also survived by her sister Lorraine Quelch; a brother, Eugene Brown; a stepmother, June (Brown) Lawrence; a stepsister, Sandra (Brown) Matterson; a stepbrother, Jerry Brown; her nieces and nephews; and by many of her lifelong family friends.

She was predeceased by her youngest son Mike in January of 2012; her mother, Gloria Brown; her dad, Merle Brown; her youngest sister Connie Grant; her niece Cheryl Trumbull; and by her nephews: Bruce Martin and Daryl Lyon.

There will be no calling hours. A private family graveside service and luncheon will be held at a later date. She will be interred at the Irasburg Cemetery.

In lieu of flowers, contributions in her memory may be made to the Lamoille Area Cancer Network, 198 Farr Avenue, Morrisville, Vermont 05661.

Online condolences at curtis-britch.com.

Berdina J. Baraw

Berdina J. Baraw, 86, died on June 16, 2015, in Newport.

She was born on November 25, 1928, in Newport, a daughter of Arthur and Doris (Wheeler) Gibney.

In August of 1946, she married Charles Baraw, who predeceased her on September 16, 1992.

She enjoyed going for rides on all the back roads in Orleans and Essex counties. She enjoyed her many pets over the years. She was a loving, caring mother and grandmother and always enjoyed having them come and visit.

She is survived by her children: Eula Lucas and her husband, David, of Newport, Charles Baraw and his wife, Judy, of Derby, Frederick Baraw and his wife, Annette, of Newport Center, Wilbure Baraw of Newport, and Bruce Baraw of Newport; Brenda LaCross and her husband, Dennis, of Westmore, Robert Baraw of Newport, Cynthia DeGreenia and her husband, Terry, of Brownington, Richard Baraw of Newport, and Arlene Willis of Cavendish; and by several great-grandchildren.

She was predeceased by two infant siblings; two brothers: Dale and Gordon; and by two sisters: Lillian and Ila.

Funeral services were held on June 19, in Newport.

Should friends desire, contributions in her memory may be made to the Orleans Essex Visiting Nurse Association and Hospice, 46 Lakemont Road, Newport, Vermont 05855.

Online condolences at curtis-britch.com.

obit BrochuStephen R. Brochu

Stephen R. Brochu, 65, of Derby Line, beloved husband of Paula, died at his home on June 28, 2015.

He was born on August 25, 1949, to Gerard and Bella (Bedard) Brochu in St. Johnsbury.

On May 15, 1971, he married the former Paula Bullis, who survives him.

He was on active duty serving in the United States Marine Corps, where he was a recipient of the Purple Heart. After serving in the Marines, he was a recruiter for the Vermont National Guard. He was a former member of the Knights of Columbus, a member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post #798 of Newport, the American Legion Post #21 of Newport, and the Elks Club Post #2155 of Derby. He spent a lot of time and enjoyed being an advocate for many of the veterans. He loved to have his family together for family gatherings.

He is survived by his wife, Paula Brochu, of Derby Line; his children: Christine Yates and her husband, Brian, of Jericho, and Stephen Brochu and his wife, Amy, of South Burlington; his cherished grandchildren: Ashley Papin and her husband, Andrew, of South Burlington, Joshua Yates of Jericho, and Damian and Emily Brochu of South Burlington; the following brothers and sisters: Eva Brochu, Anna Sanville and her husband, Charles, Clara Brochu, Rita Choquette and her husband, Omer, Martha Dupont, Theresa Round, Patty Mann, Leah Cook and her husband, Ron, Rene, Gerard, Alfred, and John Brochu; many nieces, nephews, and cousins; and by his brothers- and sisters-in-law: Jack Bullis, obit vets flagDianne Bullis, Craig Bullis and his wife, Diana, Dan Bullis and his wife, Sharon, Mary George and her husband, Wendell, and Judy Bullis.

He was predeceased by his sister Maria Buck; as well as by his parents.

Friends may call from 5 to 7 p.m. on Wednesday, July 1, at the Curtis-Britch-Converse-Rushford Funeral Home, at 4670 Darling Hill Road in Newport. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. on Thursday, July 2, at St. Edward’s Catholic Church in Derby Line. Interment will follow at St. Mary’s Cemetery in Newport, with full military honors.

Online condolences at curtis-britch.com.

Doris Elaine Barbin Monette

Doris Elaine Barbin Monette died on June 21, 2015, in Newport.

She was born in Newport on October 27, 1927, the only child of Joseph O. Barbin and Zula May Dymond.

After graduating as Valedictorian of the Class of 1945 at Newport High School, she worked for the W.C. Lister Insurance Agency and Montgomery Wards and later as a dispatcher at the Derby Barracks of the Vermont State Police, from where she retired in 1990.

On October 24, 1949, she married John A. Monette in Newport. They enjoyed traveling, both on their own and in later years with Community Circle. For several years after her retirement, they spent winters in Texas and South Carolina.

After retirement, she joined RSVP and volunteered at the Chamber of Commerce booth and the Goodrich Memorial Library. She also knitted many hundreds of pairs of mittens and countless hats and other items for the RSVP Christmas projects. She was also interested in local history and genealogy. She had researched the Barbin and Monette families back to the late 1600s, translating many materials from French to English in the process.

She is survived by her sons: John P. Monette and his wife, Janet (Hussey), of Newport, Gerard R. Monette of Greenville, North Carolina, and his former wife, Denise (Quenville), of South Burlington, Paul L. Monette, of Newport, and Roger J. Monette and his husband, Jonathan Welch, of Portland, Oregon; and by her three granddaughters: Megan Monette of Fayston, and Danielle and Michelle Monette, both of South Burlington.

She was predeceased in 2003 by her husband.

In accord with her wishes, there will be no service. Visiting hours were held in Newport on June 26. Internment will be at the convenience of the family in the family plot at St. Mary’s Cemetery.

In lieu of flowers, contributions in her memory may be made to the Goodrich Memorial Library, Main Street, Newport, Vermont 05855.

Online condolences at curtis-britch.com.

obit sableskiEleanor (Kambour) Sableski

Eleanor (Kambour) Sableski, a long-time resident and musician who lived in Durham and Chapel Hill, North Carolina, for 47 years, died on Wednesday, May 20, 2015, at Carney Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, after a brief hospitalization.

She lived at Rogerson House in the Boston area for the past year.

Born in 1925 in Providence, Rhode Island, she grew up in northern Vermont and spent her summers at a family cottage on Shadow Lake in Glover. She attended Smith College briefly before relocating to Boston. She moved to the Triangle area in 1967, and soon found herself fully active in the life of the newly emerging Eno River Fellowship as the music director. Her musical talents bloomed over the years as she completed a degree in music education at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill and assumed musical leadership of the Common Women’s Chorus from 1983 to 2001. As a choir conductor, she was kind, encouraging, and inspiring. She did not accept bad music (and what an ear she had!), and she elicited the best from the people she worked with. She was also a long-standing member of the Choral Society of Durham; her skill as a chorus member gave her the opportunity to perform in Israel and at Carnegie Hall, and she later participated in the Triangle Jewish Chorale and the Village Review. On at least one occasion she played the organ at Duke Chapel.

Each summer, she made a spiritual pilgrimage to her family cottage in Vermont, and a musical pilgrimage to SUUSI (Southeast Unitarian Universalist Summer Institute).

She moved to Rogerson House in May of 2014, and, in spite of a failing memory, made an impression on residents and staff alike as “a human jukebox,” playing hymns and leading sing-alongs for the residents on a daily basis. During her final days in the hospital she sang to the staff, her daughter, and her doctors.

She is survived by her three adult children and her daughter-in-law: Nancy Sableski and Anne Rousseau of Boston, Steven Sableski of Charlotte, North Carolina, and Sarah Sableski of Wilmington, North Carolina.

Memorial gifts may be made to the Vermont Land Trust at vlt.org, or the Campaign for Southern Equality at southernequality.org, or the Rogerson Communities at rogerson.org.

A memorial service was held in Durham, North Carolina, on June 6.

obit SheltraRosemary C. Sheltra

Rosemary C. Sheltra, 63, of Derby died on June 23, 2015, in Newport.

She was born on July 17, 1951, in Newport to Alva and Maxine (Austin) Batchelder.

On February 14, 1999, she married Dennis Sheltra, who predeceased her in 2012.

She enjoyed watching NASCAR and Star Trek. She also enjoyed making floral arrangements and ceramics. She loved her dog Molly and her cat Oreo.

She is survived by her children: Tina Lucas of Wolcott, Casandra Dailey and her husband, Harry, of Woodbury, Becky Miller and her husband, Eric, of Derby, Stanley Crowe II of Derby, and Kimberly Bingham and her husband, Jason, of Island Pond; her grandchildren: Samantha Corkins and her husband, Cole, Tamara Burnett, Christopher Schneider, Ashley Schneider, Rebecca, Kaitlin, Brianna, and Shawn Rice, Nicholas Bingham, Thomas and James Dailey, McKenzie, Maverick, and Graham Crowe, Tyler Perkins, and Jamie Royer; her seven great-grandchildren; and by her sisters: Nickolet Simpson and her significant other, David LaBelle, of Derby, and Joi Merritt and her husband, Rory, of North Carolina.

She was predeceased by her father, Alva Batchelder; her mother, Maxine Austin; her stepfather Burton Austin; and by her granddaughter Jessie Lynn.

Funeral services were held on June 28, in Newport.

Should friends desire, contributions in her memory may be made to the Derby Line Ambulance Service; or to the Derby Pond Animal Hospital, 2757 Route 5, Derby, Vermont 05829.

Online condolences at curtis-britch.com.

obit SpringMarion E. Spring

Marion E. Spring, 76, died peacefully in Newport, on June 22, 2015.

She was born to Howard Lynaugh and Nora Stuart on October 10, 1938, in Concord.

She loved to travel to Atlantic City and Foxwoods Casino. She also enjoyed knitting, and she loved her dog Shorty.

She was a lifetime member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Auxiliary in Inverness, Florida.

She is survived by her children: Rhonda Jackson and her husband, David, of Fairhaven, Penny Flynn of Troy, Tammy Vallieres and her husband, Gaetan, of Inverness, and John Spring and his wife, Michelle, of Jay; her brothers: Oscar Lynaugh of Victory, Johnny Lynaugh, and Larry Lynaugh; her sister Betty Stowell of Lyndonville; and by her special friend, Meagan Tomczak, of Inverness. She is also survived by her seven grandchildren, several great-grandchildren, and by numerous nieces and nephews.

She was predeceased by her sister Connie Williams; and by her brother Bernard Lynaugh.

Services will be held at the convenience of the family.

Should friends desire, contributions in her memory may be made to Moffitt Cancer Center at 12902 USF Magnolia Drive, Tampa, Florida 33612.

Online condolences at curtis-britch.com.

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New eatery comes to Barton

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WEB eddie truck outsidecopyright the Chronicle June 24, 2015

by Natalie Hormilla

BARTON — Eddie Seadale’s newest food venture is operated out of a truck. Mr. Seadale, former owner of The Parson’s Corner restaurant, has set up the truck at the business he owns with his wife, Lori, River’s Edge Farmstand.

Mr. Seadale cooks and serves up a menu that’s made up on the fly — but he doesn’t seem even remotely worried about that.

“When Mom will say, Edward, I’m thinking of making this, I say, Great, because I know it’ll be good,” he said, zipping about his teeny kitchen Monday afternoon. “That’s how we roll.”

Mr. Seadale and his mother, Anne Seadale, are the duo behind the Copper Plate, which opened earlier this month. Mr. Seadale’s mother turns 83 in July, and the two have worked together before.

“We worked together in Southie at my first place.….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Energetic senior citizen powers the new Glover meal site

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Gloria Powers pauses in the middle of cleaning the kitchen in the Glover Town Hall in preparation for the opening of the new Glover senior meal site on June 29.  From left to right are her granddaughter Brittany Marsh, honorary granddaughter Chelsea Pulver, Gloria Powers, and her daughter Kristi Powers, who is also Brittany's mother.  Ms. Pulver will also help cook and serve at the meal site.  Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Gloria Powers pauses in the middle of cleaning the kitchen in the Glover Town Hall in preparation for the opening of the new Glover senior meal site on June 29. From left to right are her granddaughter Brittany Marsh, honorary granddaughter Chelsea Pulver, Gloria Powers, and her daughter Kristi Powers, who is also Brittany’s mother. Ms. Pulver will also help cook and serve at the meal site. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle June 24, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

GLOVER — Gloria Powers never stands still. At 70 years old, she is a tiny dynamo of a woman who simply exudes energy. And right now, she’s a woman with a mission.

On Monday, June 29, Ms. Powers will serve up the first meals at the new senior meal site in the basement of the town hall here, and she still has a lot to do.

She is approaching the project with relish.

Last Friday morning, with just ten days to go before opening, she was busy cleaning and organizing the kitchen where she will cook the weekly senior meals. The menus were planned and the food donations were in the freezer….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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At Gardner park: Block party kicks off summer meal program

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Ellen Apple helps her Spiderman suit-clad son Myles hold a bunny at the petting zoo at the block party in Gardener Park in Newport on June 18.  For each animal he held, he asked his mom to go find “Nana” so he could show her.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Ellen Apple helps her Spiderman suit-clad son Myles hold a bunny at the petting zoo at the block party in Gardener Park in Newport on June 18. For each animal he held, he asked his mom to go find “Nana” so he could show her. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle June 24, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

NEWPORT — Green Mountain Farm-to-School’s (GMFTS) second annual block party, held at Gardner Park, was bigger and better than last year’s huge success.

That was GMFTS Chairman Julie Poulin’s assessment of the even, which was held on Thursday.

“We’re very lucky to have lots of health and education related organizations in our area,” she said.

Each of those organizations had a tent at the block party, many of which were provided by Newport Parks and Recreation, Ms. Poulin said.

The purpose of the event was to raise awareness about local organizations with activities or products that promote health, and to celebrate the beginning of GMFTS’ ten-week summer meal program called the Lunchbox.

The Lunchbox’s food truck was serving free meals for kids….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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